Biblical Studies



Biblical and Theological Examination of the Role of Women in Ministry

Faculty: Dr. James O. Wolfe III (Profile)

Description: This course will explore the biblical and theological bases for the exercise of ministry by women in the Church. An investigation will be made of biblical texts which intimate women in ministry and a full range of theological traditions will be considered including the historical sweep of the subject as a theological issue in historical theology.

Required Reading:

Online Registration Form

++ Return to Top


A Biblical Theology for Biotechnology

Faculty: Dr. Paul J. Kirbas (Profile)

Description: This course will consider a biblical ethic for nature itself, as well as the human manipulation of nature that is at the center of many aspects of current biotechnology. Building upon a core understanding of this biblical ethic, the course will invite participants to evaluate a chosen area of biotechnology by utilizing a tool that is offered by the course. While the first several sections of response papers should be focused on the core material, the final sections should reflect the student’s own choice of a particular biotechnological issue to be addressed.

Required Reading:

Online Registration Form

++ Return to Top


Communicating the Gospel to a Post-Literate, Digital Culture

Faculty: Dr. D. Jonathan Watts (Profile)

Description: The church has always faced the challenge of presenting the Word of God in a way which relates to its contemporary culture. The church of the twenty-first century, defined as a Post-Literate or Digital Culture, is no exception. This tutorial, using the text The Forensic Reconstruction of a Good Story: Gospeltelling to a Digital Culture, explores the patterns and models for the exegetical investigation of a biblical text and to provide a method for preaching/proclamation within a multisensory environment.

The first unit reviews the historical background of worship followed by a historical understanding of the role of preaching/proclamation in the expansion and development of the church. The third unit examines the differing methods of sermon/proclamation creation. The fourth unit explores an approach labeled Gospeltelling: a biblically based, exegetical, narrative style of preaching designed to relate to the Digital Culture. Unit five is a model for bridging the ancient text to the current culture through thorough exegetical examination and cultural connection. The final unit concludes with a presentation of the development and application of that method using the parable of The Prodigal Son found in Luke 15.

Required Reading:

Online Registration Form

++ Return to Top


Encountering the Resurrection Narratives

Faculty: The Rev. Dr. Donald E. Blumenfeld (Profile)

Description: This E–Tutorial examines the resurrection accounts and post-resurrection appearance narratives in the canonical Gospels. The cultural, historical and theological antecedents of resurrection belief will be considered. An exegetical study of the passages will be undertaken, emphasizing the historical-critical approach to Biblical theology.

Required Reading:

Online Registration Form

++ Return to Top


Social Entrepreneurship as a "Gospel Compatible" Business Model

Faculty: The Reverend Dr. Joanne Neal (Profile)

Description: This e-tutorial focuses on two essential questions:

  • To what extent might social entrepreneurship be a constructive model for the integration of ethical business and management practices and Christian faith values?
  • How might social enterprise allow the Church and business to partner in the resolution of intractable social problems with which social entrepreneurship is concerned?

The processes of globalization have resulted in both positive and negative outcomes for human beings and for the environment. Social entrepreneurship, as a constructive outcome of globalization, has its own particular niche within the global market economy. Social entrepreneurship is a phenomenon that has been steadily gaining ground in the past two decades. It is a dimension of entrepreneurial activity aimed at generating social value and creating sustainable change rather than focusing on producing monetary profit as its primary goal. Social entrepreneurship, at its heart, is highly compatible with the values, beliefs, and goals of the Christian Church in its mission to achieve social, economic, and environmental justice. It has tremendous potential to be an inspiring exemplar of what it means to live out the Gospels.

Required Reading:

Online Registration Form

++ Return to Top