Pastoral Logotherapy



Classical Schools of Psychotherapy

Faculty: Dr. John H. Morgan (Profile)

Description: This tutorial is designed to introduce the student or, in the case of the student already familiar with some or all of the theorists discussed here, to refresh the student’s memory of the major systems of classical thought in psychotherapy. The course will consist of three components in the treatment of each system of thought; namely, the biography of the theorist, the key aspects of his theoretical constructs, and a major text in each particular school of thought. Because there are eight schools of thought considered in the text and only six papers required for this course, the student may select the six theorists of most interest and write a 500-word paper on each of those six.

Required Reading:

  • Clinical Psychotherapy: A History of Theory and Practice by John H. Morgan.
  • PRIMARY SOURCE RECOMMENDED READINGS: The required text listed above gives a comprehensive bibliography for each of the eight schools of psychotherapy considered in this course. The student should select two texts from one or more of the schools of thought discussed in the required text. The theorists discussed are Sigmund Freud, Alfred Adler, Carl Jung, Viktor Frankl, Erik Erikson, Abraham Maslow, Carl Rogers, and Harry Stack Sullivan.

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Discovering Meaning in Marriage

Faculty: Andrew P. Spore, D.Min., Visiting Professor of Pastoral Logotherapy (Profile)

Description:  This E-Tutorial will equip students to use the logotherapeutic premarital counseling protocol, Discovering Meaning in Marriage.  “Marriage offers an ideal arena in which to discover meaning…  A logotherapeutic approach to marital preparation may serve to strengthen this fragile institution by preparing couples to discover meaning in and through it” (from the introduction to Discovering Meaning in Marriage: A Logotherapeutic Approach to Premarital Counseling, by Andrew P. Spore).  Students will explore important relationship concepts from a specifically Franklian perspective.  In particular, they will reflect on the role of meaning discovery in love and intimacy, and they will learn to communicate to couples the importance of living responsibly in the marriage relationship.  Additionally, the foundation laid by this tutorial will provide counselors with valuable resources for working with couples who are already married. 

Required Reading:  
Recommended Reading: 

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Pastoral Logotherapy I: Introduction

Faculty: Dr. Ann V. Graber Offered as E-Tutorial, supplemented by telephone discussion. (Profile)

or Dr. Jeremiah Murasso  Offered as E-Tutorial, without telephone discussion. (Profile

Description: Beginning with an historical introduction, the course presents the underlying philosophy, personality theory, and psychotherapy formulated by Viktor E. Frankl, MD, PhD. Dr. Frankl’s logotherapy emphasizes the significance of the human spirit, the uniqueness and dignity of the human being, and meaning in life as the primary motivation for living. Logotherapy’s relevance to pastoral counseling will be highlighted in this course.

Required Reading:

  • Handbook: Introduction to Pastoral Logotherapy * (based on An Introduction to Logotherapy by Robert C. Barnes, revised for Pastoral Logotherapy by Ann V. Graber)
  • Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl.
  • Recollections - an Autobiography by Viktor E. Frankl

* Texts indicated by an asterisk will be sent to students free of charge as pdf files following registration.

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Pastoral Logotherapy II: General Applications

Faculty: Dr. Randy L. Scraper (Profile)

Description:  This course will cover general applications of the principles and techniques of Logotherapy: self-distancing, de-reflection, Socratic dialogue, paradoxical intention, and phenomenological existential methods used to facilitate change in attitude, personal growth, and gaining greater self-knowledge through life-review and life pre-view.  Logotherapy’s relevance to pastoral counseling will be highlighted in this course.

Required Reading:

  • Instructional Manual: General Applications of Pastoral Logotherapy by Dr. Randy L. Scraper (This is a pdf document available for download from the syllabus after registration)
  • The Will to Meaning by Viktor Frankl (Available at Amazon.com)
  • The Unheard Cry for Meaning by Viktor Frank  (Available at Amazon.com)

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Pastoral Logotherapy III: Reflection on Fundamental Areas of Life

Faculty: Dr. Ann V. Graber Offered as E-Tutorial, supplemented by telephone discussion. (Profile)

or Dr. Jeremiah Murasso Offered as E-Tutorial, without telephone discussion.  (Profile

Description: This course will focus on vital areas of interest to pastoral care givers and invite reflection on these fundamentals of human existence: The meaning of Life, Death, Suffering, Work, and Love. Further exploration of the medicine chest of logotherapy with wholeness and self-transcending growth as therapeutic goals, as well as application of logotherapy in crisis intervention will be covered.

Required Reading:

  • Instructional Manual: Pastoral Logotherapy -- Reflection on Fundamental Areas of Life *
  • The Doctor and the Soul by Viktor Frankl
  • Synchronization in Birkenwald * by Viktor Frankl
  • Any additional pertinent texts assigned by the Instructor

* Texts indicated by an asterisk will be sent to students free of charge as pdf files following registration.

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Pastoral Logotherapy IV: Assist in Man’s Search for Ultimate Meaning

Faculty: Dr. Ann V. Graber (Profile)

Offered as E-Tutorial, supplemented by telephone discussion.

Description: Further logotherapeutic approaches to facilitate growth and transformation through activation of creative, experiential and attitudinal values will be presented. Overcoming meaninglessness, despondency and despair in the unavoidable vicissitudes of life will be addressed. The focus will be on activating client's inner strengths, choosing life with meaning that leads to psycho-spiritual well-being and reaches toward ultimate meaning – God.    

Required Reading: 

  • Man’s Search for Ultimate Meaning by Viktor Frankl
  • The Feeling of Meaninglessness by Viktor Frankl
  • Viktor Frankl’s Logotherapy: Method of Choice in Ecumenical Pastoral Psychology * by Ann V. Graber
  • Any pertinent supplemental materials suggested by the instructor or selected by the student

* Texts indicated by an asterisk will be sent to students free of charge as pdf files following registration.

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Franklian Psychology and Christian Spiritual Formation

Faculty: Dr. Randy L. Scraper (Profile)

Description: The purpose of this tutorial is to acquaint the student with the ways in which Viktor Frankl’s Logotherapy and Logo philosophy interact with Christian Spiritual Formation. The student will learn how Franklian psychology provides one axis of a meaning matrix that helps pastors and educators better understand Christian spiritual maturity. The primary texts expose Dr. Frankl’s mature thinking on the subjects of ultimate meaning and how his life and work continue to benefit a meaningful understanding of the human spirit. Dr. Scraper’s book defines and describes the origination and use of a meaning matrix that includes Franklian psychology in better understanding Christian spiritual maturity.

Required Reading:

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Meaningful Prayer I – A Logotherapeutic Approach to Prayer for Guidance, Direction, and Purpose in Life

Faculty: Dr. Randy L. Scraper (Profile)

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The purpose of this tutorial is to help the student gain a working understanding of meaningful prayer as a viable Logotherapeutic approach to guidance and direction through prayer and Christian spiritual maturity. The course will examine the fundamental understanding of Logotherapy, the theological understanding of “the three ways” of Christian spiritual development and their relationship to the meaning matrix that flows from the combination of these two understandings of the human spirit and the Christian spiritual life of meaningful prayer. The student will gain an understanding of the theory and practice of meaningful prayer as a Logotherapeutic approach to guidance and direction for finding purpose in life. 

REQUIRED READINGS: (Selected Chapters)
  • Man’s Search for Ultimate Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl (2000) (Perseus – ISBN 0-7382-0354-8)
  • Franklian Psychology and Christian Spiritual Formation by Randy L. Scraper (2009) (Wyndham Hall – E book available.)
  • Viktor Frankl’s Logotherapy by Ann V. Graber (2004) (Wyndham Hall)

SUGGESTED READINGS:

  • Spiritual Passages by Benedict J. Groeschel
  • Mysticism by Evelyn Underhill

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Meaningful Prayer II – A Logotherapeutic Approach to Healing Prayer

Faculty: Dr. Randy L. Scraper (Profile)

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The purpose of this tutorial is to help the student gain a working understanding of meaningful prayer as a viable Logotherapeutic approach to healing prayer and Christian spiritual maturity. (Familiarity with a fundamental understanding of Logotherapy, the theological understanding of “the three ways” of Christian spiritual development and their relationship to the meaning matrix that flows from the combination of these two understandings of the human spirit and the Christian spiritual life of meaningful prayer will be most helpful. Meaningful Prayer I or Spiritual Shepherding would be helpful prerequisite courses although any course on Viktor Frankl’s Logotherapy would be helpful.)

The student will gain an understanding of the theory and practice of meaningful prayer as a Logotherapeutic approach to healing prayer.
 
REQUIRED READINGS: (Selected Chapters)
  • Finding Sanctuary by Abbot Christopher Jamison (2006) (Liturgical Press – ISBN 978-0-8146-3263-5)
  • Franklian Psychology and Christian Spiritual Formation by Randy L. Scraper (2009) (Wyndham Hall – E book available. – ISBN 978-1-55605-394-8)
  • Meaning in Suffering by Elisabeth Lukas (Institute of Logotherapy Press – ISBN 0-917867-05-X)
SUGGESTED READINGS:
  • Spiritual Passages by Benedict J. Groeschel
  • Mysticism by Evelyn Underhill 

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Near Death Experiences and their Life-Transforming Impact

Faculty: Dr. Ann V. Graber (Profile)

Offered as E-Tutorial, supplemented by telephone discussion.
 
Description: The primary objective of this course is to help lessen the fear of death and dying. To that end, we will look at some near-death experiences described by various individuals; research conducted on NDE’s and related phenomena; and the transformation of consciousness that often follows such experiences. Of particular interest will be how to prepare oneself for a peaceful transition; and, how to be present to others at this stage of spiritual growth on their journey homeward.
 
Required Reading:
  • The Journey Home ~ Preparing for Life’s Ultimate Adventure by Ann V. Graber (2009)    To request a copy of this book, which is provided free of charge to registered student, click here.
  • On Life after Death by Elizabeth Kubler-Ross, M.D.  (1991) 
Recommended Resources:

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On Grief and Bereavement

Faculty: Dr. Ann V. Graber (Profile)

Offered as E-Tutorial, supplemented by telephone discussion.

Description: When we lose someone we love or experience a loss of something that we hold very dear, we tend to fall into a state of grief. Grief can be felt as mental anguish, sorrow or profound sadness. Grief is a normal response to a deeply felt loss. Bereavement is the process of grieving and mourning such losses. Grief is a singular, often lonely experience for each person. No two people grieve alike. Their uniquely individual grieving process must be respected to foster healing after their loss.
 
Required Reading:  
Supplemental Reading: (Recommended, not required)  

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Spiritual Shepherding - A Logotherapeutic Approach to Pastoral Care

Faculty: Dr.Randy L. Scraper (Profile)

Description: The purpose of this tutorial is to help the student gain a working understanding of spiritual shepherding as a viable Logotherapeutic approach to pastoral care.  The course will examine the fundamental understanding of Logotherapy, the origination and use of “the three ways” of Christian spiritual development and the development of a meaning matrix that flows from the combination of these two understandings of the human spirit and the Christian spiritual life.

Required Textbooks:
  • Franklian Psychology and Christian Spiritual Formation by Randy L. Scraper (2009) (Wyndham Hall – E book available.)
  • Viktor Frankl’s Logotherapy by Ann V. Graber (2004) (Wyndham Hall)
Recommended Readings 
  • Spiritual Passages by Benedict J. Groeschel
  • Mysticism by Evelyn Underhill
  • Jesus as Counselor (Provided free of charge by the Graduate Theological Foundation at the time of course registration)

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Viktor Frankl’s Logotherapy and Twelve Step Programs of Recovery

Faculty: Dr. Ann-Marie Neale (Profile)

Premise: The purpose of this e-tutorial is to show the similarities and differences in the philosophies inherent in Logotherapy and the 12 Steps Programs of recovery from alcohol or other addictions. Students who enroll would benefit from having had some background in Franklian Psychology either through our Pastoral Logotherapy Program or other e-tutorials offered by GTF faculty or through their own study and readings. Knowledge of 12 Step programs would be an asset but is not a requirement. Students will not only read and study these two programs; they will also read a two act play which is a fictionalized account of a meeting in the Afterlife between the founders of Alcoholics Anonymous and Dr. Viktor Frankl. 

One of the major tenets of Franklian Psychology, also known as Logotherapy, and Existential Analysis is that we can find meaning through our attitude in the face of unavoidable pain, guilt or death. In addition, Dr. Frankl teaches that meaning is found through self transcendence and that happiness is a by-product of doing something for others, for the world and for the good of humankind. He maintained that it is Life that demands something from each of us- something unique that only each individual can offer. It is our responsibility to answer this challenge from life.
 
People who are in recovery from alcohol, drugs or other addictions as well as family and friends of these individuals often find sobriety and meaning through participation in 12 –Step Recovery Programs such as Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous, Overeaters Anonymous, Gamblers Anonymous and Alanon Family Groups. In addition to attending meetings, members actively practice the 12 Steps of Recovery which are a group of principles, spiritual in nature, which not only help sufferers maintain sobriety and stay away from their addiction, but also guide them in service to others that they may find a happy and fulfilled life again.
 

 
 
Required Textbooks: Both are available on Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com as well as on Nook and Kindle. 
  • Alcoholics Anonymous, 4th Ed. (2001). New York City: Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc. [3rd Edition is acceptable although page numbers will not be the same; chapters & appendices as well as content (some stories which are not required are different) are identical.]
  •  Frankl, V. (1984). Man’s search for meaning: An introduction to Logotherapy (3rd Ed.). New York: Simon & Schuster. [Later editions are acceptable. Be sure to purchase one that has Parts Two and Three.]
  •  Required Play: Available from Graduate Theological Foundation after registration for course.
  •  Neale, A. M. (2009). The Heavenly Group: We are not saints. Unpublished manuscript.

Recommended Readings (not required for this course): All are available on Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com 

  • Alcoholics Anonymous comes of age: A brief history of A.A. (1985) New York City: Alcoholics Anonymous World Service.
  • Alcoholics Anonymous Pamphlet (1941)The Jack Alexander Article about AA” New York City: Alcoholics Anonymous World Service, Inc.
  • As Bill sees it: The AA way of life (1967). New York City: Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc.
  • Bergman, S, & Surrey, J. (2007). “Bill W. and Dr. Bob: The original off-broadway production,” Northern Light Productions. Center City, Minn.: Hazelden.
  • Brown D. & Brown S. (2001). Mrs. Marty Mann: The first lady of alcoholics anonymous. Minnesota: Hazelden.
  • Cheever, S. (2004). My name is Bill. New York: Washington Square Press.
  • Courage to change: One day at a time in Alanon II (1992). Virginia Beach, VA: Alanon Family Group Headquarters, Inc.     
  • Frankl, V. E. (2000). Man’s search for ultimate meaning. Cambridge, Mass,: Basic Books.
  • Frankl, V. E. (2004). On the theory and therapy of mental disorders. New York, NY: Brunner-Routledge.
  • Frankl, V. E. (1986). The doctor and the soul. New York: Vintage Books.
  • Frankl, V. E. (2010). The feeling of meaninglessness. Wisconsin: Marguette University Press.
  • Frankl, V. (1988). The will to meaning: Foundations and applications of Logotherapy (Exp. Ed.). New York: Meridian.
  • Graber, A. V. (2004). Viktor Frankl’s Logotherapy (2nd Ed.): Method of choice in ecumenical pastoral psychology. Lima, Ohio: Wyndham Hall Press.
  • How Alanon works for families and friends of alcoholics. (1995). Virginia Beach, VA: Alanon Family Group Headquarters, Inc.
  • James, W. (2002). The varieties of religious experience. New York: The Modern Library.
  • Kurtz, E. & Ketcham, K. (2002). The spirituality of imperfection: Storytelling and the search for meaning. New York: Bantam Books.
  • Living sober: some methods A.A. members have used for not drinking. (1998). New York City: Alcoholics Anonymous World Service.
  • Mitchell, D. (2002). Silkworth: The little doctor who loved drunks. Center City, Minn.: Hazelden.
  • Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions (1981). New York City: Alcoholics Anonymous World Service, Inc.

 

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Viktor Frankl and Logotherapy

Faculty: Dr. John H. Morgan (Profile)

Description: This tutorial is designed to acquaint the student with Viktor Frankl and the fundamentals of his thought. Rather than settle for merely a secondary-source summary of who he was and what he thought, this course will concentrate on Frankl’s life and, by using a classic text, will explore the essentials of his thought. The introductory material presented in Morgan’s chapter on Frankl is a way of establishing the parameters of the tutorial. The biography is an in-depth look at Frankl’s life. The classic text is a primary source to expose the student to Frankl himself.

Required Reading:

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