Spirituality



Benedictine Spirituality in Our Time

Faculty: Dr. Anthony Burkart (Profile)

Description: Benedict, who crafted the “Rule of St. Benedict”, possessed a certain genius for the understanding of human nature, its strengths and frailties, and how this configured itself into the life of community. Although originally intended for the eremitic(monastic) community of his time its profundity possess a universality to all times and applicability to human community outside of cloistered life. Two aspects permeate the Benedictine approach, balance and living with paradox and contradiction in the rumble tumble of our daily lives. We will use two required texts. One is a nuts and bolts look at the “Rule” in our contemporary time. The other is an opportunity to read the “Rule” in a Lectio format(Lectio is an approach that allows the head to connect with the heart) and respond to it from your own personal experience and insights.

Required Reading:

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Big Bang Spirituality: Creation, Evolution, the Cosmos and Rational Faith

Faculty: Rev. Jorge R. Colón, S.T.D., Ph.D., D. Div., Rev. François-Xavier Durrwell, C.Ss.R., Professor of Theology (Profile)

Description: The course explores the basic relationship between the origin of the universe, creation, evolution, and the final consummation of creation. It considers theological and scientific perspectives, and leads the student to discover new links between science and spirituality.

Required textbook for the graduate and undergraduate level:

  • Christoph Cardinal Schönborn. Chance or Purpose?: Creation, Evolution and a Rational Faith. San Francisco, Ignatius Press 2007. www.ignatius.com

Alternative Textbook
If you prefer, you can also use this alternative textbook for the Big Bang Spirituality e-tutorial.  
  • Philip A. Rolnick.  Origins.  God, Evolution, and the Question of the Cosmos. Waco, Texas: Baylor     University Press, 2015.

Additional Graduate Level Texts and Recommendations (pick one additional text for this course)

  • Ledger, Christine and Pickard, Stephen, eds.  Creation and Complexity:  Interdisciplinary Issues in Science and Religion.  Adelaide: ATF Press, 2004.
  • Singh, Simon.  Big Bang. The Origin of the Universe. NY: Harper Collins Publishers, 2004.
  • Horn, Stephan Otto and Wiedenhofer, Siegfried.  Creation and Evolution.  San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 2008.
  • Swimme, Brian.  The Hidden Heart of the Cosmos: Humanity and the New Story.  Maryknoll, NY, 2008.
  • Farrell, John.  The Day Without Yesterday: Lemaitre, Einstein, and the Birth of  Modern Cosmology. New York: Avalon, 2005. www.avalonpress.net
  • Arber, Werner; Cabibbo, Nicola and Sanchez Sorondo, Marcelo, eds. Pontificia Accademia delle Scienze.  Plenary Session 2008. (Pontifical Academy of the Sciences).The proceedings of the Plenary Session on Scientific Insights into the Evolution of the Universe and of Life, 31 October- 4 November 2008.  Vatican City: Ex Aedibus Academicis in Civitate Vaticana, 2009.
  • Rolnick, Philip A.  God, Evolution, and the Question of the Cosmos. Waco, Texas:  Baylor University Press, 2015.

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Christian Spirituality

Faculty: Rev. Jorge R. Colón, S.T.D., Ph.D., D. Div., Rev. François-Xavier Durrwell, C.Ss.R., Professor of Theology (Profile)

Description: A study of the basic theological foundations of Christian Spirituality, considering its biblical images and its historical expressions in the Church. The course will explore the types of Christian spiritualities, some denominational considerations in Catholicism, Orthodoxy and Protestantism, and will study the link between the basic Christian mysteries and spirituality, such as creation, the Trinity, the incarnation, redemption and resurrection. It will also study some examples of classic texts of major spiritual masters.

Required textbook for the graduate and undergraduate level:

Additional Graduate Level Texts and Recommendations (pick one additional text for this course)

  • Barry, William A. A Friendship Like No Other: Experiencing God’s Amazing Embrace. Chicago, Loyola Press 2008.  www.loyolabooks.org
  • Clement, Olivier. On Human Being: A Spiritual Anthropology.  Hyde Park, NY 2000 www.newcitypress.com
  • Consiglio, Cyprian.Spirit, Soul, Body: Toward an Integral Christian Spirituality.  Collegeville, Minnesota: Liturgical Press, 2015.
  • Lang, Martin A.Christian Spirituality: A Program of Study and Prayer Based on St. Matthew's Gospel. Lanham: University Press of America, 2008.
  • Maloney, George A.  Discovering the Hidden Reality: A Journey into Christian Mystical Prayer. Staten Island, NY 204 www.albahouse.org
  • Markides, Kyriacos C.Inner River: A Pilgrimage to the Heart of Christian Spirituality. New York: Image Books, 2012.
  • Abiding in the Indwelling Trinity.  Mahwah, NJ 2004 www.paulistpress.com
  • O’Malley, William J. Holiness.  Maryknoll, NY 2008 www.maryknoll.org
  • Perrin, David Brian. Studying Christian Spirituality. New York; London, Routledge, 2007.
  • Schmidt, Richard H.God Seekers: Twenty Centuries of Christian Spiritualities. Grand Rapids, Mich.: William B. Eerdmans Pub. Co., 2008.
  • Winter, David. The Road Well Travelled: Exploring Traditional Christian Spirituality.  Canterbury Press Norwich, 2009.
  • Woods, Richard.Christian Spirituality: God's Presence through the Ages. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis Books, 2006.

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Contemporary Meditation and Mindfulness Practice in Buddhist Thought

Faculty: Dr. John A. Stultz (Profile)

Premise: With meditation and mindfulness becoming more popular and a part of the mainstream society, how exactly are these practices understood by Buddhists today? This course will explore the current thinking, methods and practices gleaned from ancient schools to current presentations. This will be an extremely informative course for anyone interested in understanding better the practices of meditation and mindfulness and their application in the contemporary culture.  

Required Textbooks:  Both are available through Amazon.com 
  • Smalley, Susan L. (Author) and Winston, Diana (Co-Author). Fully Present: the science, art, and practice of mindfulness. (Philadelphia: First Da Capo Press, 2010)
  •  Stultz, Anthony.  Free Your Mind: The Four Directions of an Awakened Life. (New York-Lincoln-Shanghai: iUniverse, 2007) 
Suggested Reading: Available through Amazon.com 
  • Hanson, Rick. Buddha's Brain: The Practical Neuroscience of Happiness, Love & Wisdom. (USA; New Harbinger Publications, 2009)

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Franklian Psychology and Christian Spiritual Formation

Faculty: Dr. Randy L. Scraper (Profile)

Description: The purpose of this tutorial is to acquaint the student with the ways in which Viktor Frankl’s Logotherapy and Logo philosophy interact with Christian Spiritual Formation. The student will learn how Franklian psychology provides one axis of a meaning matrix that helps pastors and educators better understand Christian spiritual maturity. The primary texts expose Dr. Frankl’s mature thinking on the subjects of ultimate meaning and how his life and work continue to benefit a meaningful understanding of the human spirit. Dr. Scraper’s book defines and describes the origination and use of a meaning matrix that includes Franklian psychology in better understanding Christian spiritual maturity.

Required Reading:

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Irish Spirituality

Faculty: Dr. Anthony Burkart (Profile)

Description: Ours is an age in which the institutional church struggles amidst the rapidly changing templates of our world’s circumstances.
The church, its clergy and laity wrestle with its role, how to act that out in the world, worship and its meaning and living breath in our lives, gender identities, issues of sexuality and the roots of the Christian tradition and transformational teachings of Jesus.

In the past twenty five years there has been a renewed interest in Celtic Christianity for some quite specific reasons. The Celts never institutionalized, dove underground when the Roman Church attempted to absorb it. Gender made little difference in the functions within church life, women and men sharing in ecclesiastical functions and roles, bishopry and leadership, abbots and abbotress’s of monastic communities which usually incorporated whole villages. But perhaps most significant is that the contemplative tradition was never divorced from the life of the people allowing the head-heart connection to permeate the daily life of the church community.

Most scholars agree that the term “Celtic Christianity” is inaccurate and much to all encompassing. After the 5th century, the church in Ireland, Wales and Scotland took distinctly different turns and varied forms. So we will focus in Irish Celtic Christianity as such in it’s form and practice.

There remains an extensive list of books available but for the purpose of this brief course. We will look at two books as required reading and one which is optional but of immense interest, fun and entertaining.

Required Reading:

Optional Reading:

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Jesus and Buddha - a comparative study

Faculty: Dr. John A. Stultz (Profile)

 

Premise: Many contemporary Christians have begun to investigate the practices of Buddhism and are often surprised at the similarities in the narratives and the shared parabolic nature of the teachings of both Christ and Buddha. Most studies look at this scenario from a Christian point of view. This course will offer students an opportunity to see the Christ Story from the Buddhist perspective; giving a fresh view of the Gospel and a renewed understanding of the meaning of Christianity.

 

 

All texts are available through Amazon.com

 

 

  • Living Buddha Living Christ by Thich Nhat Hahn Jesus and Buddha: the Parallel Sayings by Marcus Borg
  • The Good Heart: A Buddhist Perspective on the Christian Scriptures by Dalai Lama

 

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Meaningful Prayer I – A Logotherapeutic Approach to Prayer for Guidance, Direction, and Purpose in Life

Faculty: Dr. Randy L. Scraper (Profile)

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The purpose of this tutorial is to help the student gain a working understanding of meaningful prayer as a viable Logotherapeutic approach to guidance and direction through prayer and Christian spiritual maturity. The course will examine the fundamental understanding of Logotherapy, the theological understanding of “the three ways” of Christian spiritual development and their relationship to the meaning matrix that flows from the combination of these two understandings of the human spirit and the Christian spiritual life of meaningful prayer. The student will gain an understanding of the theory and practice of meaningful prayer as a Logotherapeutic approach to guidance and direction for finding purpose in life. 

REQUIRED READINGS: (Selected Chapters)
  • Man’s Search for Ultimate Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl (2000) (Perseus – ISBN 0-7382-0354-8)
  • Franklian Psychology and Christian Spiritual Formation by Randy L. Scraper (2009) (Wyndham Hall – E book available.)
  • Viktor Frankl’s Logotherapy by Ann V. Graber (2004) (Wyndham Hall)

SUGGESTED READINGS:

  • Spiritual Passages by Benedict J. Groeschel
  • Mysticism by Evelyn Underhill

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Meaningful Prayer II – A Logotherapeutic Approach to Healing Prayer

Faculty: Dr. Randy L. Scraper (Profile)

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The purpose of this tutorial is to help the student gain a working understanding of meaningful prayer as a viable Logotherapeutic approach to healing prayer and Christian spiritual maturity. (Familiarity with a fundamental understanding of Logotherapy, the theological understanding of “the three ways” of Christian spiritual development and their relationship to the meaning matrix that flows from the combination of these two understandings of the human spirit and the Christian spiritual life of meaningful prayer will be most helpful. Meaningful Prayer I or Spiritual Shepherding would be helpful prerequisite courses although any course on Viktor Frankl’s Logotherapy would be helpful.)

The student will gain an understanding of the theory and practice of meaningful prayer as a Logotherapeutic approach to healing prayer.
 
REQUIRED READINGS: (Selected Chapters)
  • Finding Sanctuary by Abbot Christopher Jamison (2006) (Liturgical Press – ISBN 978-0-8146-3263-5)
  • Franklian Psychology and Christian Spiritual Formation by Randy L. Scraper (2009) (Wyndham Hall – E book available. – ISBN 978-1-55605-394-8)
  • Meaning in Suffering by Elisabeth Lukas (Institute of Logotherapy Press – ISBN 0-917867-05-X)
SUGGESTED READINGS:
  • Spiritual Passages by Benedict J. Groeschel
  • Mysticism by Evelyn Underhill 

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Meditation for Christians- integration and transformation

Faculty: Dr. John A. Stultz (Profile)

Premise : As the myriad health benefits continue to be espoused for meditation more Christians are looking for practices that will give them those benefits while at the same time allowing them to have integrity within their own faith tradition. This course will explore the historical and scientific basis for meditation and how it can be integrated in anyone's life. 

All texts are available through Amazon.com 

  • Mind in the Balance: Meditation in Science, Buddhism, and Christianity (Columbia Series in Science and Religion) [Paperback] B. Alan Wallace (Author)
  • Compassion and Meditation: The Spiritual Dynamic between Buddhism and Christianity [Paperback] Jean-Yves Leloup (Author)
     

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The Passive Night of the Senses, St. John of the Cross, Dark Night Book I

Faculty: Rev. Jorge R. Colón, S.T.D., Ph.D., D. Div., Rev. François-Xavier Durrwell, C.Ss.R., Professor of Theology (Profile)

Graduate-level course. This course is only offered at the Graduate Level (Master, Doctorate) 

Objectives: The first eight chapters of the Dark Night, Book I, by St. John of the Cross focus on the seven capital sins. The remaining six chapters consider other aspects of the Passive Night of the Senses.  This course will guide the student in reading the fourteen chapters of Book I. Following scholarly writings on St. John of the Cross, the course will also focus on the life and spiritual journey of this great mystic and doctor of the Church, and will consider aspects of his mysticism. 

Primary text:
Secondary text:                                  
Complementary texts:

 

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The Passive Night of the Senses, St. John of the Cross, Dark Night Book II

Faculty: Rev. Jorge R. Colón, S.T.D., Ph.D., D. Div., Rev. François-Xavier Durrwell, C.Ss.R., Professor of Theology (Profile)

Graduate-level course. This course is only offered at the Graduate Level (Master, Doctorate) 

In The Dark Night, Book II, chapters 1-8, St. John of the Cross deals with the Passive Night of the Spirit, whereas chapters 9-25 constitute, properly, a treatise on the Passive Night of the Spirit. This course will guide the student in reading the 25 chapters of Book II. Following scholarly writings about St. John of the Cross, the course will focus on the mystic’s transformation through the experience of the dark night of the spirit.
 

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Personal Meaning and Spiritual Wholeness

Faculty: Dr. John H. Morgan (Profile)

Description: This course is designed for those interested in reading and discussing the works of the leading figures of the 20th century. The emphasis will be upon the concept of "meaning" as relates to the purpose and direction of personal existence and the pursuit of spiritual well-being. The student will read a major text in the field which consists of a careful analysis of the key thinkers, followed by three classic texts of the student's choice related to the assigned readings for each of six 500-word essays.

Required Reading:

Recommended Reading: 

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Praying the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius: A Retreat on Inner Peace in Divine Love

Faculty: Rev. Susan Fowler, Ph.D., Dorothy Day Professor of Spirituality (Profile)

Introduction
Your whole life is your spiritual life; God is in every part of it. In this online retreat format, and under the guidance of a certified spiritual director, you will reflect on the principles and practices of the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius, a wise guide for those who seek greater freedom and authenticity, a clearer sense of God’s presence in your life, a closer discernment of your deepest desires, and sacred union with God and the whole Cosmos.
 
Purpose and Structure of this etutorial retreat*
The purpose of this first retreat, then,  is to remember, experience and express love: to remember how one has been loved by God and others in their lives, to experience Divine Love in intimacy with the Trinity, and to respond to that love with a generous and giving Spirit to God, self and others in word and deed.
 
It is structured into four weeks with a different yet related theme and four days of practice weekly which engages you in a structured daily exercise of prayer, practice and reflection about some aspect of your ordinary life rhythms in order to bring you more deeply into relationship with God. (see readings in week one for specifics).   As Hansen notes, “a week has its own integrity, and made in order, serves the desire for the primary gift and inner peace in each…retreatant.” 
 
Each week you’ll do the exercises, write your reflections in your listening book, which you’ll use to write your weekly reflection. In addition, you have the option of having a ½ hour telephone conversation with the course instructor at the end of each week.
 
Text: Hansen, Michael The First Spiritual Exercises. Notre Dame IN Ave Maria Press 2013
            May be ordered at www.amazon.com
            Handouts as provided
            A Journal or notebook that will serve as your Listening Book 
 
*A NOTE: This tutorial is the first of four retreats, corresponding to the themes of the four weeks of the Spiritual Exercises: Inner Peace in Divine Love, Inner Peace in Darkness and Light, Inner Peace in Friendship with Jesus and Inner Peace in the Service of God. While each retreat is similar in structure and aim, each has specific purposes and prayers that are designed to bring one closer in a particular way.   This retreat (Inner Peace in Divine Love) is required to be taken before the others; after completion, you may then choose whichever of the other three draws you to it. Note that you do not have to take all four.  

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Irish Spirituality

Faculty: Dr. Anthony Burkart (Profile)

Description: Ours is an age in which the institutional church struggles amidst the rapidly changing templates of our world’s circumstances.
The church, its clergy and laity wrestle with its role, how to act that out in the world, worship and its meaning and living breath in our lives, gender identities, issues of sexuality and the roots of the Christian tradition and transformational teachings of Jesus.

In the past twenty five years there has been a renewed interest in Celtic Christianity for some quite specific reasons. The Celts never institutionalized, dove underground when the Roman Church attempted to absorb it. Gender made little difference in the functions within church life, women and men sharing in ecclesiastical functions and roles, bishopry and leadership, abbots and abbotress’s of monastic communities which usually incorporated whole villages. But perhaps most significant is that the contemplative tradition was never divorced from the life of the people allowing the head-heart connection to permeate the daily life of the church community.

Most scholars agree that the term “Celtic Christianity” is inaccurate and much to all encompassing. After the 5th century, the church in Ireland, Wales and Scotland took distinctly different turns and varied forms. So we will focus in Irish Celtic Christianity as such in it’s form and practice.

There remains an extensive list of books available but for the purpose of this brief course. We will look at two books as required reading and one which is optional but of immense interest, fun and entertaining.

Required Reading:

Optional Reading:

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Socially Engaged Buddhism

Faculty: Dr. John A. Stultz (Profile)

Premise: In the twentieth century a new form of socially engaged spirituality has emerged. This course will explore the current theories, methods and practices. This will be an extremely informative course for anyone interested in understanding better the emerging ‘Navayana’ schools of Buddhism.  

Required Textbooks:  Both are available through Amazon.com 
  • Keown, Damien (Co-Author). Prebish, Charles S. (Author). Queen, Christopher S. (Co-Author) Stultz, Anthony J. (Co-Author) Action Dharma: New Studies in Engaged Buddhism. (London: Routledge Curzon, 2003) 
  • Queen, Christopher S. (Author). Stultz, Anthony J. (Co-Author) Engaged Buddhism in the West. (Somerville:Wisdom Publications,2012))

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Spirituality and Dreams

Faculty: Howard Avruhm Addison, Ph.D. (Profile)

Premise: The prophet Joel foresaw a time when God’s spirit would be manifest among us, when men and women, young and old would dream dreams and see visions (Joel 2:28). Yet, despite being heirs to rich traditions of dream work, our modern denominations give but little credence to the role dreams can play in our spiritual development. Drawing upon the insights of world religious traditions, modern psychology and contemporary neuroscience, this course will investigate how dreams can help reveal the movement of the Spirit within us. Through practical dream work techniques we will explore to how illogical or even frightening dream images can lead us and those whom we serve to greater wholeness.
 
Required Textbook:  Available through Amazon.com 
  • Krippner, Stanley and Waldman, Mark R. (eds.). Dreamscaping. (Lincolnwood, IL: Lowell House, 1999)
Additional readings, both required and supplemental, and selected Dream Work practices for each week will be available on-line

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Spirituality and Psychology I

Faculty: Dr. Anthony O. Nwachukwu (Profile)

Description: There is a big connection between spirituality and psychology. Prayer could be a spiritual exercise if demonstrated in action. Most people think that spirituality is based on the number of hours spent in a Church or the hood of a monk. Spirituality has nothing to do with all that except when intrinsically evaluated within the context of decision and behavior. On the other hand, it takes into account all the minutest details of what we do, the way we do it, the intention for it etc cetera. In this sense, psychology becomes a vehicle through which spirituality becomes feasible and attainable. There can be psychology without spirituality or religion, but there can be no religion or spirituality without psychology. Besides, spirituality is not the same thing as religion per se.

Required Reading:

WRITING ASSIGNMENT:

1. Who is spiritual?
2. To what extent does spirituality resemble religion and differ from it?
3. How is psychology related to spirituality?
4. Is being spiritual the same as being religious –explain?
5. Can an Atheist be spiritual?
6. What makes spirituality interesting in the practice of religion?

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Spirituality and Psychology II

Faculty: Dr. Anthony O. Nwachukwu (Profile)

Description: There is a big connection between spirituality and psychology. Prayer could be a spiritual exercise if demonstrated in action. Most people think that spirituality is based on the number of hours spent in a Church or the hood of a monk. Spirituality has nothing to do with all that except when intrinsically evaluated within the context of decision and behavior. On the other hand, it takes into account all the minutest details of what we do, the way we do it, the intention for it etc cetera. In this sense, psychology becomes a vehicle through which spirituality becomes feasible and attainable. There can be psychology without spirituality or religion, but there can be no religion or spirituality without psychology. Besides, spirituality is not the same thing as religion per se.

Required Reading:

WRITING ASSIGNMENT:

1. Psychology seems to incorporate or cut across all fields of study, do you agree?
2. Man is both psychological and spiritual/religious – expatiate?  
3. Which of these is an option for heavenly rewards – spirituality or religion?
4. Relationships are more of psychological than religious – explain with examples.
5. Is there any miracle or magic in a relationship one is not ready to maintain or keep?
6. “Everyone is his or her own relationship” – how do you react to that?

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Spiritual Shepherding - A Logotherapeutic Approach to Pastoral Care

Faculty: Dr.Randy L. Scraper (Profile)

Description: The purpose of this tutorial is to help the student gain a working understanding of spiritual shepherding as a viable Logotherapeutic approach to pastoral care.  The course will examine the fundamental understanding of Logotherapy, the origination and use of “the three ways” of Christian spiritual development and the development of a meaning matrix that flows from the combination of these two understandings of the human spirit and the Christian spiritual life.

Required Textbooks:
  • Franklian Psychology and Christian Spiritual Formation by Randy L. Scraper (2009) (Wyndham Hall – E book available.)
  • Viktor Frankl’s Logotherapy by Ann V. Graber (2004) (Wyndham Hall)
Recommended Readings 
  • Spiritual Passages by Benedict J. Groeschel
  • Mysticism by Evelyn Underhill
  • Jesus as Counselor (Provided free of charge by the Graduate Theological Foundation at the time of course registration)

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Traditional Representative Characters of Christian Spirituality

Faculty: Rev. Jorge R. Colón, S.T.D., Ph.D., D. Div., Rev. François-Xavier Durrwell, C.Ss.R., Professor of Theology (Profile)

Description: Since early Christian times, men and women have responded to God’s call for an intimate relationship with him. They have responded in prayer and action, and have explored the heights of asceticism and contemplation. At the same time, they had a great impact on society and culture, as they responded to Jesus’ call to discipleship. This course will explore some of the main writings and characters of Christian Spirituality, especially from the time of the Fathers to the Renaissance.

This is only a GRADUATE Level course (Master or Doctorate) 
 
Required Reading: 
Complementary Bibliography:
  • Anonymous. The Cloud of Unknowing. Kindle Edition. Evinity Publishing Inc., 2009.
  • A Kempis, Thomas. The Imitation of Christ. Grand Rapids, MI, Christian Classics Ethereal Library.
  • Butler, Alan. Lives of the Saints. Charlotte, N.C., The Catholic Company.
  • De Avila, John of. Audi, Filia. Classics of Western Spirituality. Mahwah, N.J., Paulist Press.
  • De Ávila, Teresa of. Interior Castle.
  • http://www.catholicfirst.com/thefaith/catholicclassics/stteresa/castle/interiorcastle01.html
  • Brother Ugolino, The Little Flowers of Saint Francis of Assisi.  Dover Thrift Editions, 2003.
  • Hilton, Walter. The Scale of Perfection. Translated by John PH Clark and Rosemary
  • Dorward. New York: Paulist Press, 1991.
  • Julian of Norwich.  Revelations of Divine Love.  Grand Rapids, MI,Christian Classics Ethereal Library, 2002.
  • Master Eckhart. The Essential Writings. San Francisco, Harper One, 2009
  • Johannes Tauler. Sermons. Mahwah, N.J.: Paulist Press, 1985.
  • Van Ruysbroeck, Jan. The Spiritual Espousals. Collegeville: Liturgical Press, 1995

 

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Transforming Leadership for Social Change: Social Analysis for the 21St Century

Faculty: Rev. Susan Fowler, Ph.D., Dorothy Day Professor of Spirituality (Profile)

Course Description

What does the Lord require of you but to do justice,
 to love kindness and to walk humbly with your God.
Micah 6:8
 
This prescription sums up life in the Spirit:  A faithful disposition of heart, a practice of right relating, and an orientation toward the Holy One.   In this context, justice and compassion are cornerstones of the spiritual life and the foundations of social transformation.  
 
As spiritual values, these are understood in the context of covenants of mutuality, inclusion and egalitarianism that foster right ordering of relationships.  As transformative practices, they encompass a dialectical relationship between individuals and society, within which is an awareness of ways in which the dominant culture could be reordered to reflect life-enhancing values and just social systems.
 
In this etutorial, we will explore how these virtues cooperate in an engaged spirituality by performing a social analysis of a situation of oppression and injustice with a critical and compassionate eye, proposing solutions which are transformative, life-giving and just.
 
Required Texts and Readings
  • Cimperman, Maria.  Social Analysis for the 21st Century. Maryknoll, NY Orbis Books. 2015
  • O’Connell, Maureen. Compassion: Loving our Neighbor in an Age of Globalization.  Maryknoll, NY  Orbis Books 2009
Recommended:
  • Eyerman, Ron.  Is This America? Katrina as Cultural Trauma.  Austin TX, Univ of Texas Press. 2015    

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