Pastoral Care and Counseling Psychology



Abraham Maslow and Humanistic Psychology

Faculty: Dr. John H. Morgan (Profile)

Description: This tutorial is designed to acquaint the student with Abraham Maslow and the fundamentals of his thought. Rather than settle for merely a secondary-source summary of who he was and what he thought, this course will concentrate on Maslow’s life and, by using a classic text, will explore the essentials of his thought. The introductory material presented in Morgan’s chapter on Maslow is a way of establishing the parameters of the tutorial. The biography is an in-depth look at Maslow’s life. The classic text is a primary source to expose the student to Maslow himself.

Required Reading:

Recommended Reading: 

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Al-Anon Family Groups: A 12 –Step Program for Friends and Families of Problem Drinkers

Faculty: Dr. Ann-Marie Neale (Profile)

Premise: The purpose of this e-tutorial is to educate about and familiarize students with the 12- Step Program known as Al-Anon Family Groups (Al-Anon). Members of the clergy, such as pastors and chaplains, mental health counselors and others who are simply interested in learning more about this self-help recovery program will benefit from the e-course as they will likely encounter individuals who may be in need of such a program or who may already be attending meetings. Al-Anon’s primary purpose is to offer support to family and friends of people with alcohol problems; however, families and friends of individuals who are struggling with another type of addiction, mental illness, or problematic behavior may also attend these meetings.  Its aim is to help spouses, parents, children, friends, and co-workers begin to focus on their own lives whether or not they continue in a relationship with their loved ones. The term “self-help” is misleading as Al-Anon’s success lies in the group support and shared experiences of its members. 

Al-Anon unofficially began when early members of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA), attended meetings in the co-founder, Dr. Bob Smith’s home in Akron Ohio. Dr. Bob’s wife, Ann noticed that wives were sitting outside in cars waiting for their husbands. She began inviting them into her kitchen for tea and conversation. While Ann Smith did not live to see the birth of the official program known as Al-Anon; nevertheless, it was her thoughtfulness towards these women that was the catalyst for its inception. Lois Wilson, the wife of Bill Wilson, the other co-founder of AA, and other wives of the early members of AA were the early members of what is today known as Al-Anon Family Groups. This 12-Step Program continues to offer support, guidance and hope to countless thousands of individuals all over the world; however, this e-course is in no way an attempt to advocate for Al-Anon as a place for family and friends to seek help. It is a description of the program, its historical beginnings, how it works, and some of the reasons for its huge success and continued existence.
 
Required Textbooks & CDs: Books available on Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com. CD Set is available from the web-site: www.inlight.com 
  • Courage to change: One day at a time in Al-Anon II (1992). Virginia Beach, VA: Al-Anon Family Group Headquarters, Inc. 
  • How Al-Anon works for families and friends of alcoholics. (1995). Virginia Beach, VA: Al-Anon Family Group Headquarters, Inc. 
  • Weston, Tom, SJ. Control Is Our Drug: In the language of Al-Anon (2010). 6 CD Set available from InLight Productions: www.inlight.com. Penn Valley, CA 
Recommended Resources (not required for this course): All books are available on Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com. CD Sets is available from the web-site: www.inlight.com
Al-Anon Pamphlets are available free of charge at local Al-AnonMeetings.  Information about Al-Alanon is available at: www.al-anon.alateen.org 
  • Bergman, S, & Surrey, J. (2007). “Bill W. and Dr. Bob: The original off-broadway production,” Northern Light Productions. Center City, Minnesota: Hazelden.
  • Borchert, W.G. (2005). The Lois Wilson Story: When Love is Not Enough, Minnesota: Hazelden.
  • Casey, Karen. (2010). Let Go Now: Embracing Detachment, San Francisco: Red Wheel/Weiser LLC
  • Courage To Be Me: Living with Alcoholism (1996). Virginia Beach, VA: Al-Anon Family Group Headquarters, Inc.
  • Hope For Today (2007). Virginia Beach, VA: A-Anon Family Group Headquarters, Inc.
  • Paths to Recovery: Al-Anon’s Steps, Traditions, and Concepts (1997). Virginia Beach, VA: Al-Anon Family Group Headquarters, Inc.
  • Fr. Terry R. (2007). The Al-Anon Paradox: Let Go and Get a Grip, 6 CD Set available from InLight Productions: www.inlight.com. Penn Valley, CA
  • Fr. Terry R. (2011). We Don’t Have to Git-m, 6 CD Set available from InLight Productions: www.inlight.com. Penn Valley, CA
  • Weston, Tom, SJ. Act, Don’t React (2005). 6 CD Set available from InLight Productions: www.inlight.com. Penn Valley, CA
  • Weston, Tom, SJ. Asking for Help... It's Never Our First Thought (2011). 5 CD Set available from InLight Productions: www.inlight.com. Penn Valley, CA
  • Weston, Tom, SJ. In Great Need Of 100,000 Al-Anon Meetings (2011). 6 CD Set available from InLight Productions: www.inlight.com. Penn Valley, CA

 

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Alcoholics Anonymous: A Spiritual Program of Recovery

Faculty: Dr. Ann-Marie Neale (Profile)

Premise:  The primary purpose of this e-course is to familiarize students with the principles and methods of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) so that they can give accurate information to those they serve. Mental health therapists, psychologists, psychiatrists, chaplains, rabbis, priests and ministers from all religious denominations will at some point in their professional lives encounter individuals who suffer from alcoholism or other addictions. Many of these people have found sobriety through active participation in 12 –Step Recovery Programs such as Alcoholics Anonymous (AA). Others may be considering whether to attend AA meetings and will ask their pastor, spiritual advisor or therapist what they know about these programs. 

There is often misunderstanding about AA and how it works; therefore, this course is intended to introduce students to the underlying principles of the program as well as offer some reasons for its enormous success throughout the world. This e-course is in no way an attempt to advocate for Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) as a self-help group; rather, it is a description of the program, its historical beginnings, how it works, and some of the reasons for its huge success and continued existence. AA has two important components- Group Meetings known as “The Fellowship” where members connect with others who have a desire to stop drinking and/or to stay sober; and “The Spiritual Program” which is based on following AA's  12 –Steps of Recovery. These steps are a group of principles, spiritual in nature, which have  helped many victims of alcoholism maintain sobriety and stay away from their addiction, and also guide them in service to others that they may find a happy and fulfilled life once again. Since AA began in June of 1935, it has had unsurpassed success in helping people maintain sobriety. In addition, other similar 12 Step programs such as Narcotics Anonymous, Overeaters Anonymous, Gamblers Anonymous and Al-Anon (for family and friends) have their roots in Alcoholics Anonymous.
 
Required Textbooks: All are available on Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com as well as on Nook and Kindle.   
  • Alcoholics Anonymous, 4th Ed. (2001). New York City: Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc.
  • [3rd Edition is acceptable although page numbers will not be the same; chapters & appendices as well as content are identical (some stories which are not required are different).]
  •  Kurtz, E. & Ketcham, K. (2002). The spirituality of imperfection: Storytelling and the search for meaning. New York: Bantam Books.
  •  Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions (1981). New York City: Alcoholics Anonymous World Service, Inc. 
Recommended Readings (not required for this course): All books are available on Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com.  AA Pamplets are available free of charge through local AA Service Centers, at AA Meetings and through Alcoholics Anonymous World Services. 
  • Alcoholics Anonymous comes of age: A brief history of A.A. (1985) New York City: Alcoholics Anonymous World Service.
  • Alcoholics Anonymous Pamphlet (1941)The Jack Alexander Article about AA” New York City: Alcoholics Anonymous World Service, Inc.
  • As Bill sees it: The AA way of life (1967). New York City: Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc.
  • Bergman, S, & Surrey, J. (2007). “Bill W. and Dr. Bob: The original off-broadway production,” Northern Light Productions. Center City, Minn.: Hazelden.
  • Brown D. & Brown S. (2001). Mrs. Marty Mann: The first lady of alcoholics anonymous. Minnesota: Hazelden.
  • Brown, Stephanie. A Place Called Self: Women, Sobriety, and Radical Transformation. (Minnesota: Hazelden, 2004)
  • Cheever, S. (2004). My name is Bill. New York: Washington Square Press
  • Cheever, Susan. Note Found in a Bottle: A Memoir. (New York: Washington Square Press, 1999)
  • Covington, Stephanie. A Woman’s Way Through the Twelve Steps. (Minnesota: Hazelden, 1994)
  • Dr. Bob and the Good Oldtimers (1980) New York City: Alcoholics Anonymous World Service
  • Erdman, Jack & Kearney, Larry. Whiskey’s Childern.  (New York: Kensington Books, 1994)
  • Experience, Strength and Hope: Stories from the first three editions of Alcoholics Anonymous. (1984) New York City: Alcoholics Anonymous World Service
  • Fisher, Carrie. Wishful Drinking. (New York: Simon and Schuster, 2008)
  • Ketcham, Katherine & Ashbury, William F. Beyond the Influence: Understanding and Defeating Alcoholism. (New York: Bantam Books, 2000)
  • Knapp, Caroline. Drinking: A Love Story. (New York: The Dial Press, 1996)
  • James, W. (2002). The varieties of religious experience. New York: The Modern Library.
  • Jersild, Devon. Happy Hours: Alcohol in a Woman’s Life. (New York: HarperCollins, 2001)
  • Lamott, Anne. Traveling Mercies: Some Thoughts on Faith. (Anchor Books, 1999)
  • Living sober: some methods A.A. members have used for not drinking. (1998). New York City: Alcoholics Anonymous World Service.
  • Lewis, Richard.  The Other Great Depression. (New York: Melonball Productions, 2000)
  • Mitchell, D. (2002). Silkworth: The little doctor who loved drunks. Center City, Minn.: Hazelden.
  • ‘Pass it on;’ The Story of Bill Wilson and how the AA Message reached the world. (1984) New York City: Alcoholics Anonymous World Service

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Alfred Adler and Individual Psychology

Faculty: Dr. John H. Morgan (Profile)

Description: This tutorial is designed to acquaint the student with Alfred Adler and the fundamentals of his thought. Rather than settle for merely a secondary-source summary of who he was and what he thought, this course will concentrate on Adler’s life and, by using a classic text, will explore the essentials of his thought. The introductory material presented in Morgan’s chapter on Adler is a way of establishing the parameters of the tutorial. The biography is an in-depth look at Adler’s life. The classic text is a primary source to expose the student to Adler himself.

Required Reading:

Recommended Reading: 

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Benedictine Spirituality in Our Time

Faculty: Dr. Anthony Burkart (Profile)

Description: Benedict, who crafted the “Rule of St. Benedict”, possessed a certain genius for the understanding of human nature, its strengths and frailties, and how this configured itself into the life of community. Although originally intended for the eremitic(monastic) community of his time its profundity possess a universality to all times and applicability to human community outside of cloistered life. Two aspects permeate the Benedictine approach, balance and living with paradox and contradiction in the rumble tumble of our daily lives. We will use two required texts. One is a nuts and bolts look at the “Rule” in our contemporary time. The other is an opportunity to read the “Rule” in a Lectio format(Lectio is an approach that allows the head to connect with the heart) and respond to it from your own personal experience and insights.

Required Reading:

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Carl Jung and Analytical Psychology

Faculty: Dr. John H. Morgan (Profile)

Description: This tutorial is designed to acquaint the student with Carl Jung and the fundamentals of his thought. Rather than settle for merely a secondary-source summary of who he was and what he thought, this course will concentrate on Jung’s life and, by using a classic text, will explore the essentials of his thought. The introductory material presented in Morgan’s chapter on Jung is a way of establishing the parameters of the tutorial. The biography is an in-depth look at Jung’s life. The classic text is a primary source to expose the student to Jung himself.

Required Reading:

Recommended Reading: 

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Carl Rogers and Person-Centered Psychotherapy

Faculty: Dr. John H. Morgan (Profile)

Description: This tutorial is designed to acquaint the student with Carl Rogers and the fundamentals of his thought. Rather than settle for merely a secondary-source summary of who he was and what he thought, this course will concentrate on Rogers’ life and, by using a classic text, will explore the essentials of his thought. The introductory material presented in Morgan’s chapter on Rogers is a way of establishing the parameters of the tutorial. The biography is an in-depth look at Rogers’ life. The classic text is a primary source to expose the student to Rogers himself.

Required Reading:

Recommended Reading: 

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Classical Schools of Psychotherapy

Faculty: Dr. John H. Morgan (Profile)

Description: This tutorial is designed to introduce the student or, in the case of the student already familiar with some or all of the theorists discussed here, to refresh the student’s memory of the major systems of classical thought in psychotherapy. The course will consist of three components in the treatment of each system of thought; namely, the biography of the theorist, the key aspects of his theoretical constructs, and a major text in each particular school of thought. Because there are eight schools of thought considered in the text and only six papers required for this course, the student may select the six theorists of most interest and write a 500-word paper on each of those six.

Required Reading:

  • PRIMARY SOURCE RECOMMENDED READINGS: The required text listed above gives a comprehensive bibliography for each of the eight schools of psychotherapy considered in this course. The student should select two texts from one or more of the schools of thought discussed in the required text. The theorists discussed are Sigmund Freud, Alfred Adler, Carl Jung, Viktor Frankl, Erik Erikson, Abraham Maslow, Carl Rogers, and Harry Stack Sullivan.

Recommended Reading: 

 

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Clergy Options To Parish Ministry

Faculty: Dr. John H. Morgan (Profile)

Description: To leave the parish ministry is a major decision clergy find themselves periodically faced with owing to a variety of factors, often spawned by stress over parish relations, economics exigencies, domestic considerations, etc., but, whatever the precipitating cause, facing that possibility is a grave challenge and responsibility. Over the past fifty years and more, the GTF has seen hundreds of clergy come through our training programs and not infrequently some of them eventually leave their parish ministry to enter other forms of ministry.  This tutorial is designed to (1) explore the reasons why clergy leave and to (2) explore those other fields of ministry to which these individuals have felt themselves called.  

The reasons why clergy choose to leave the parish ministry will be explored particularly as relates to stress resulting from parish relations and their cognates including economic and domestic considerations.   Those fields to which clergy leaving the parish choose to pursue will include the chaplaincy, counseling, teaching, business, spiritual direction, and canon laws and mediation.
 
Required Reading: 
  • After the Call: A Structural and Functional Analysis of the Ministry Profession by John H. Morgan. This is a three-in-one TEXT: The Practice of Ministry in a Changing World; Clergy Stress and Satisfaction in the Workplace; and The New Paradigm in Ministry Education (GTF Books, 2014). (Available from the GTF.)
  • Pastors in Transition: Why Clergy Leave Local Church Ministry by Dean R. Hoge and Jacqueline E. Wenger (Eerdmans, 2005 Available from Amazon.com). 
Required Blog Readings: 

Recommended Reading: 

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Clinical Pastoral Psychotherapy

Faculty: Dr. John H. Morgan (Profile)

Description:  This tutorial is designed for professional practitioners, whether ordained or a licensed practitioner, and those interested in the field of clinical psychotherapy from a pastoral perspective.  The focus will be to explore more substantively the range of issues addressed and confronted in the course of a counseling venue, whether within the context of a parish, institutional setting, or private practice.  The required text titled Clinical Pastoral Psychotherapy functions as a handbook for practice, a resource for information, and provides some helpful guidelines for professional counseling.    The second required text titled Clinical Psychotherapy: A History of Theory and Practice constitutes the major resource for the top classical and modern schools of psychotherapy with which all practitioners should be generally acquainted.  The recommended but not required text titled Psychology of Religion: A Commentary on the Classic Texts functions as a background reading to contextualize the discussion of the relationship between psychology and religion.

Required Texts:
Recommended Text (not required): 

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Clinical Psychopathology and Personality Disorders

Faculty: Dr. John H. Morgan (Profile)

Description:  For the professional counselor, whether in parish ministry or private practice, dealing with personality disorders constitutes the lion’s share of the counseling enterprise and case load for both pastors and counselors.  This course is designed as a practitioner’s guide for the facilitation of a clinical and professional approach to the diagnostic assessment of the personality disorders explicated in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.  The mental health community has suspended the use of the term “mental illness” in deference to “mental disorders” and for pastors and clinical counselors this shift has enhanced the effectiveness of the diagnostic assessment and treatment agenda.  This course is specifically created for the advanced doctoral student in counseling psychology to assist these professionals in the recognition and description of personality disorders recognized by the American Psychiatric Association in the DSM source book.   

Required Reading:
  • Psychopathology: A Clinical Guide to Personality Disorders by John H. Morgan (South Bend, IN: GTF Books, 2018).
  • Clinical Psychotherapy: A History of Theory and Practice (from Sigmund Freud to Aaron Beck) by John H. Morgan (South Bend, IN: GTF Books, 2017). 
Recommended but not Required Background Reading: 
  • Understanding Ourselves: Essays in the History and Philosophy of the Social Sciences by John H. Morgan (South Bend, IN: GTF Books, 2017).

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Disasters & Community Trauma: Mental health issues of Survivors & First Responders

Faculty: Dr. Ann-Marie Neale (Profile)

Premise: It seems like almost every day we are continually faced with the aftermath of natural or technological disasters, acts of terrorism and other community trauma. It is impossible to turn on the news or browse the Internet without hearing of another earthquake, typhoon, tsunami, plane crash, act of terror or other tragic event. As a Mental Health Specialist with the American Red Cross, I had firsthand experience with counseling survivors of natural disasters as well as being of help to the volunteers and first responders. Survivors of these tragic events have immediate needs that are physical, emotional and psychological in nature. First responders such as local mental health professionals, firefighters, police officers and clergy often experience fatigue, emotional distress and exhaustion. Whether first responders are lay volunteers or come from professional agencies such as the local police force, the National Guard, FEMA, local fire departments, from volunteer agencies such as the Red Cross or the Salvation Army or from volunteer local clergy, medical or mental health professionals, just like the victims (or survivors as I prefer to call them), they will also need support both during and after the event. 

 

The main purpose of this six week e-course is to familiarize students with the unique characteristics of natural and technological disasters, acts of terrorism, phases of disasters, the special needs of survivors and first responders as well as appropriate intervention techniques for both these groups. The importance of collaborative efforts among professionals such as clergy, chaplains, mental health professionals and others will be explored. While this is an introductory course and is not meant to provide in-depth training or education; it will hopefully encourage students to learn more and to implement the suggestions found in the readings and discussions.

 
Required Textbooks:      Both are available on Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com
(They are also available in e-book format) 
  • Brenner, Grant H., Bush, Daniel H., & Moses, J. (Eds). Creating Spiritual and Psychological Resilience: Integrating Care in Disaster Relief Work. (New York: Routledge, 2010)
  • Myers, Diane & Wee, David F. Disaster Mental Health Services. (New York: Routledge, 2005  
Recommended Readings (not required for this course): All are available on Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com
 
  • Cisney, J.S. & Ellers, K.L.  The First 48 Hours: Spiritual Caregivers as First Responders. (Abington Press, 2009)
  • Dass-Brailsford, Priscilla (Ed). Crisis and Disaster Counseling: Lessons learned from Hurricane Katrina and Other Disasters. (California: Sage, 2009)
  • Halpern, James & Tramontin, Mary. Disaster Mental Health: Theory and Practice. (California: Thompson Brooke/Cole, 2006)
  • Herman, Judith M.D. Trauma and Recovery. (New York: Basic Books, 1997)
  • Roberts, Rabbi Stephen B. & Ashely, Rev, Willard W.C. (Eds). Disaster Spiritual Care: Practical Clergy Responses to Community,  Regional, and National Disasters. (Vermont: Skylight Paths, 2008)
  • Quitangon, G. & Evces, M.R. (Eds). Vicarious Trauma and Disaster Mental Health: Understanding Risks and Promoting Resilience. (New York: Routledge, 2015)
  • Saylor, Conway, F. (Ed.). Children and Disasters. (New York: Springer Verlag, 2010)
  • Seeley, Karen M. Therapy After Terror: 9/11, Psychotherapists and Mental Health. (Massachusetts: Cambridge University Press, 2008)

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Disasters & Community Trauma: In Depth look at First Responders, Children, & Elderly

Faculty: Dr. Ann-Marie Neale (Profile)

While it is not required to take my e-tutorial entitled Disasters and Community: Mental Health Issues of Survivors & First Responders prior to enrolling in this course, students who have minimal background in Disaster Mental Health will benefit from starting with that course as it goes into more depth about the unique characteristics of natural and technological disasters, acts of terrorism, and phases of disasters. In addition, there is more detailed information on the general population of survivors; whereas, Disasters and Community Trauma: In-depth Look at First Responders, Children and Elderly focuses on specific groups.    
 
Premise: This second course examines the unique challenges facing first responders, children and the elderly.  First responders are usually medical or mental health professionals, local clergy, local and out of town lay volunteers, members of professional agencies such as the local police force, the National Guard, FEMA, local fire departments, or volunteer agencies such as the Red Cross and the Salvation Army.  Like the victims (or survivors as I prefer to call them), first responders will need support both during and after the event. This support will help assure that they will be able to provide the best care possible during both the immediate event and during any future ones. They will also be better able to go back to their daily lives without suffering ill effects from their service to the community. Hopefully, they will be less vulnerable to vicarious trauma. In addition to discussing the role of first responders, since the unique characteristics of children, adolescents, college students and the elderly were only briefly covered in the other e-tutorial, this course will explore issues facing these populations in more depth.
 
Required Textbooks:      Both are available on Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com
(They may also be available in e-book format) 
  • Roberts, Rabbi Stephen B. & Ashely, Rev, Willard W.C. (Eds). Disaster Spiritual Care: Practical Clergy Responses to Community,  Regional, and National Disasters. (Vermont: Skylight Paths, 2008) 
  • Quitangon, G. & Evces, M.R. (Eds). Vicarious Trauma and Disaster Mental Health: Understanding Risks and Promoting Resilience. (New York: Routledge, 2015) 
Recommended Readings (not required for this course): All are available on Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com 
  • Brenner, Grant H., Bush, Daniel H., & Moses, J. (Eds). Creating Spiritual and Psychological Resilience: Integrating Care in Disaster Relief Work. (New York: Routledge, 2010)
  • Cisney, J.S. & Ellers, K.L.  The First 48 Hours: Spiritual Caregivers as First Responders. (Abington Press, 2009)
  • Dass-Brailsford, Priscilla (Ed). Crisis and Disaster Counseling: Lessons learned from Hurricane Katrina and Other Disasters. (California: Sage, 2009)
  • Halpern, James & Tramontin, Mary. Disaster Mental Health: Theory and Practice. (California: Thompson Brooke/Cole, 2006)
  • Herman, Judith M.D. Trauma and Recovery. (New York: Basic Books, 1997)
  • Myers, Diane & Wee, David F. Disaster Mental Health Services. (New York: Routledge, 2005)
  • Saylor, Conway, F. (Ed.). Children and Disasters. (New York: Springer Verlag, 2010)
  • Seeley, Karen M. Therapy After Terror: 9/11, Psychotherapists and Mental Health. (Massachusetts: Cambridge University Press, 2008)

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Erik Erikson and Developmental Psychology

Faculty: Dr. John H. Morgan (Profile)

Description: This tutorial is designed to acquaint the student with Erik H. Erikson and the fundamentals of his thought. Rather than settle for merely a secondary-source summary of who he was and what he thought, this course will concentrate on Erikson’s life and, by using a classic text, will explore the essentials of his thought. The introductory material presented in Morgan’s chapter on Erikson is a way of establishing the parameters of the tutorial. The biography is an in-depth look at Erikson’s life. The classic text is a primary source to expose the student to Erikson himself.

Required Reading:

Recommended Reading: 

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Ethics of Life And Morality I

Faculty: Dr. Anthony O. Nwachukwu (Profile)

Description: Describe the moral implication of being a Minister of the Word [of God]? 2. Conscience is to the human heart what morality is to life. Expatiate? 3. How does morality resemble ethics? 4. To what extent do you agree that brute animals are morally bound? 5. Bioethics is primarily the application of natural sciences to modern medicine. How does it relate to or different from religion and morality? 6. To be moral is to be religious. Explicate? 7. Every human action is moral, contextually or otherwise. Comment with examples? 8. Conscience plays the role of midwife in moral actions. How? 9. “Virtus in medium stat” [Virtue stands in the middle] – Aristotle. Examine the above statement in the light of today’s materialistic tendencies? 10. To have religion or worship God is a moral obligation. Discuss? 11. What is the meeting point of morality, religion, and conscience? 12. Who is a Moralist? How is he different from and related to a hypocrite? 13. “Everybody has his own life to live.” What is the moral implication of that statement? 14. Explain what constitutes a moral act or makes an act moral?

Required Reading:

WRITING ASSIGNMENT:

  1. Describe the moral implication of being a Minister of the Word [of God]?
  2. Conscience is to the human heart what morality is to life. Expatiate?
  3. How does morality resemble ethics?
  4. To what extent do you agree that brute animals are morally bound?
  5. Bioethics is primarily the application of natural sciences to modern medicine. How does it relate to or different from religion and morality?
  6. To be moral is to be religious. Explicate?
  7. Every human action is moral, contextually or otherwise. Comment with examples?

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Ethics of Life And Morality II

Faculty: Dr. Anthony O. Nwachukwu (Profile)

Description: Describe the moral implication of being a Minister of the Word [of God]? 2. Conscience is to the human heart what morality is to life. Expatiate? 3. How does morality resemble ethics? 4. To what extent do you agree that brute animals are morally bound? 5. Bioethics is primarily the application of natural sciences to modern medicine. How does it relate to or different from religion and morality? 6. To be moral is to be religious. Explicate? 7. Every human action is moral, contextually or otherwise. Comment with examples? 8. Conscience plays the role of midwife in moral actions. How? 9. “Virtus in medium stat” [Virtue stands in the middle] – Aristotle. Examine the above statement in the light of today’s materialistic tendencies? 10. To have religion or worship God is a moral obligation. Discuss? 11. What is the meeting point of morality, religion, and conscience? 12. Who is a Moralist? How is he different from and related to a hypocrite? 13. “Everybody has his own life to live.” What is the moral implication of that statement? 14. Explain what constitutes a moral act or makes an act moral?

Required Reading:

WRITING ASSIGNMENT:

  1. Conscience plays the role of midwife in moral actions. How?
  2. “Virtus in medium stat” [Virtue stands in the middle] – Aristotle. Examine the above statement in the light of today’s materialistic tendencies?
  3. To have religion or worship God is a moral obligation. Discuss?
  4. What is the meeting point of morality, religion, and conscience?
  5. Who is a Moralist? How is he different from and related to a hypocrite?
  6. "Everybody has his own life to live.” What is the moral implication of that statement?
  7. Explain what constitutes a moral act or makes an act moral?

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Franklian Psychology and Christian Spiritual Formation

Faculty: Dr. Randy L. Scraper (Profile)

Description: The purpose of this tutorial is to acquaint the student with the ways in which Viktor Frankl’s Logotherapy and Logo philosophy interact with Christian Spiritual Formation. The student will learn how Franklian psychology provides one axis of a meaning matrix that helps pastors and educators better understand Christian spiritual maturity. The primary texts expose Dr. Frankl’s mature thinking on the subjects of ultimate meaning and how his life and work continue to benefit a meaningful understanding of the human spirit. Dr. Scraper’s book defines and describes the origination and use of a meaning matrix that includes Franklian psychology in better understanding Christian spiritual maturity.

Required Reading:

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Geriatric Psychotherapy: Pastoral Care And Nurture Of The Elderly

Faculty: Dr. John H. Morgan (Profile)

Description:  This E-Tutorial is designed for clergy and ministry professionals, both ordained and laity, who are interested in and/or involved in ministry to the post-retirement community including the elderly.  The course will explore the wide range of issues in the field of geriatrics as relates to the relevance and scope of pastoral care and counseling. 
 
Required Reading:
 
Recommended Reading:  
  • Clinical Pastoral Psychotherapy: A Practitioner’s Handbook for Ministry Professionals by John  H. Morgan. Available from the GTF.
  • Private Practice: A Guide for Clergy Considering a Counseling Career by John H. Morgan (GTF Books, 2016).  Available from the GTF

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Harry Stack Sullivan and Interpersonal Psychoanalysis

Faculty: Dr. John H. Morgan (Profile)

Description: This tutorial is designed to acquaint the student with Harry Stack Sullivan and the fundamentals of his thought. Rather than settle for merely a secondary-source summary of who he was and what he thought, this course will concentrate on Sullivan’s life and, by using a classic text, will explore the essentials of his thought. The introductory material presented in Morgan’s chapter on Sullivan is a way of establishing the parameters of the tutorial. The biography is an in-depth look at Sullivan’s life. The classic text is a primary source to expose the student to Sullivan himself.

Required Reading:

Recommended Reading: 

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The “Mature” Personality Theory Of Karen Horney, M.D.

Faculty: Dr. Ann-Marie Neale (Profile)

Premise: Dr. Karen Horney (pronounced Horn-eye) is one of the most prominent and well-respected psychiatrists, psychoanalytic therapists and personality theorists of the twentieth century. She is best known as one of the first psychoanalytic personality theorists to challenge the traditional (Freudian) psychoanalytic explanation for female personality development. In addition, Dr. Horney was a pioneer in the recognition that cultural influences are significant factors in understanding human development as well as subsequent behavior and motivation. She also differed from traditional psychoanalytic therapists in her emphasis on present day circumstances rather than childhood. Finally, Dr. Horney developed what has become known as her “Mature Theory,” in which she sought to explain and understand the origin of and treatment for what she called “basic anxiety,” a condition that she theorized originated in childhood and resulted in adult dysfunctional or neurotic behaviors. During her lifetime, psychoanalysts thought that neurosis was caused by repressed and unconscious memories. Today, the term “neurosis” is not used in psychiatric diagnosis. In today’s classification system, which is theory-free, neuroses are classified as Anxiety Disorders. Examples include Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder or Panic Disorder. It is also possible to see similarities between Karen Horney’s descriptions of neuroses and what are today known as Personality Disorders. This e-course will cover the basic concepts of Dr. Horney’s Mature Theory which has been called her most significant and unique contribution to psychoanalytic personality theory. 

Required Textbooks:  Both are available on Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com  

  • Horney, Karen. NEUROSIS AND HUMAN GROWTH: The Struggle Toward Self-Realization (New York: W.W. Norton and Company, Inc., 1991) 
  • Horney, Karen. OUR INNER CONFLICTS: A Constructive Theory of Neurosis (New York: W.W. Norton and Company, Inc., 1992) 
Recommended Readings (not required for this course): All are available on Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com 
  • http://plaza.ufl.edu/bjparis/ikhs/index.html: This web-site contains informative articles about Dr. Horney’s theory and her contribution to the field. These are available free of charge for download in PDF format. 
  • Horney, Karen M.D. Feminine Psychology. (New York: W.W. Norton and Company, Inc., 1967)
  •  Horney, Karen M.D. New Ways in Psychoanalysis.  (New York: W.W. Norton and Company, Inc., 1966)
  •  Horney, Karen M.D. Self-Analysis. (New York: W.W. Norton and Company, Inc., 1970)
  •  Horney, Karen M.D. The Neurotic Personality of our Time. (New York: W.W. Norton and Company, Inc., 1964)
  •  Paris, Bernard J. Karen Horney: Psychoanalyst’s Search for Self-Understanding. (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1994)
  •  Quinn, Susan. A Mind Of Her Own: The Life of Karen Horney. (Plunkett Lake: Plunkett Lake Press, 2011)
  • [This is only available on Nook or Kindle]

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Meaningful Living for a Healthier Life

Faculty: Dr. Randy L. Scraper (Profile)

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The purpose of this tutorial is to acquaint the student with Frankl’s thought pertaining to the discovery of meaning in life and the ability to apply that meaning to life in a way that promotes greater health.  The application is presented by Dr. Frankl’s protégé, Elisabeth Lukas. 

REQUIRED READINGS:

  • Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl (1959) (Washington Square Press)
  • Meaningful Living by Elisabeth Lukas (1984) (Institute of Logotherapy)
  • Viktor Frankl Recollections - An Autobiography by Viktor E. Frankl (1997) (Plenum)

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Meaningful Prayer I – A Logotherapeutic Approach to Prayer for Guidance, Direction, and Purpose in Life

Faculty: Dr. Randy L. Scraper (Profile)

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The purpose of this tutorial is to help the student gain a working understanding of meaningful prayer as a viable Logotherapeutic approach to guidance and direction through prayer and Christian spiritual maturity. The course will examine the fundamental understanding of Logotherapy, the theological understanding of “the three ways” of Christian spiritual development and their relationship to the meaning matrix that flows from the combination of these two understandings of the human spirit and the Christian spiritual life of meaningful prayer. The student will gain an understanding of the theory and practice of meaningful prayer as a Logotherapeutic approach to guidance and direction for finding purpose in life. 

REQUIRED READINGS: (Selected Chapters)
  • Man’s Search for Ultimate Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl (2000) (Perseus – ISBN 0-7382-0354-8)
  • Franklian Psychology and Christian Spiritual Formation by Randy L. Scraper (2009) (Wyndham Hall – E book available.)
  • Viktor Frankl’s Logotherapy by Ann V. Graber (2004) (Wyndham Hall)

SUGGESTED READINGS:

  • Spiritual Passages by Benedict J. Groeschel
  • Mysticism by Evelyn Underhill

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Meaningful Prayer II – A Logotherapeutic Approach to Healing Prayer

Faculty: Dr. Randy L. Scraper (Profile)

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The purpose of this tutorial is to help the student gain a working understanding of meaningful prayer as a viable Logotherapeutic approach to healing prayer and Christian spiritual maturity. (Familiarity with a fundamental understanding of Logotherapy, the theological understanding of “the three ways” of Christian spiritual development and their relationship to the meaning matrix that flows from the combination of these two understandings of the human spirit and the Christian spiritual life of meaningful prayer will be most helpful. Meaningful Prayer I or Spiritual Shepherding would be helpful prerequisite courses although any course on Viktor Frankl’s Logotherapy would be helpful.)

The student will gain an understanding of the theory and practice of meaningful prayer as a Logotherapeutic approach to healing prayer.
 
REQUIRED READINGS: (Selected Chapters)
  • Finding Sanctuary by Abbot Christopher Jamison (2006) (Liturgical Press – ISBN 978-0-8146-3263-5)
  • Franklian Psychology and Christian Spiritual Formation by Randy L. Scraper (2009) (Wyndham Hall – E book available. – ISBN 978-1-55605-394-8)
  • Meaning in Suffering by Elisabeth Lukas (Institute of Logotherapy Press – ISBN 0-917867-05-X)
SUGGESTED READINGS:
  • Spiritual Passages by Benedict J. Groeschel
  • Mysticism by Evelyn Underhill 

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Ministry As Profession In A Changing World

Faculty: Dr. John H. Morgan (Profile)

Description: In a carefully constructed analysis of what makes ministry a profession, this tutorial explores the range of definitions and their practices within the broader framework of the Church in the world. A structural and functional analysis of the profession of ministry “after the call” will constitute the primary focus of this tutorial.  Components of this profession such as status, education, training, regulations and protocol, privilege, power, and stability will be carefully analyzed.  It must be emphasized that this tutorial focuses upon the concept and practice of ministry “after the call,” thereby avoiding theological controversy in deference to the social and professional character of ministry.            

Required Reading: 
NOTE: This book is a three-in-one volume including The Practice of Ministry in a Changing World; Clergy Stress and Satisfaction in the Workplace; and The New Paradigm in Ministry Education.

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Modern Schools of Psychotherapy

Faculty: Dr. John H. Morgan (Profile)

Description: This tutorial is designed to strengthen the student’s acquaintance with the major systems of modern thought in psychotherapy. The course will consist of three components in the treatment of each system of thought, namely, the biography of the theorist, the key aspects of his or her theoretical constructs, and a major text in each particular school of thought.   Because there are eight schools of thought considered in the text and only six papers required for this course, the student may select the six theorists of most personal interest and write a 500-1000 word paper on each of those six thereby producing an final paper of up to six thousand words.  

Required Reading
  • Clinical Psychotherapy: A History of Theory and Practice by John H. Morgan (GTF Books, 2015). Order from GTF 
  • PRIMARY SOURCE RECOMMENDED READINGS: The required text listed above gives a comprehensive bibliography for each of the eight schools of psychotherapy considered in this course. The student should select one primary text from two of the schools of thought discussed in the required text. The eight theorists from which six should be chosen are Horney, Klein, Perls, Berne, Fromm, Ellis, Szasz, and Beck. The two primary texts of the two theorists will normally represent the student’s own personal interest in these two particular thinkers.
Recommended but not Required Background Reading: 

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The Modern Search for Personal Meaning

Faculty: Dr. John H. Morgan (Profile)

Description: A medical psychiatrist and survivor of the Holocaust, Viktor Frankl is the creator of a counseling method called “logotherapy,” or “meaning therapy.” In contrast to Freud who concentrated on the deeply represented dark side of human personality, Frankl was extremely optimistic about healing the wounded person by concentrating on his “will to meaning” in a world in which the search for the purpose and direction of life was available to all who would seek it. His classic book is complimented by an introductory commentary on his system of thought in Morgan’s book.

Required Reading:

Recommended Reading: 

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Moral Development and Child Psychology

Faculty: Dr. John H. Morgan (Profile)

Description: Jean Piaget is considered the greatest child psychologist of the 20th century and his expertise in the field of educational psychology and the psychology of children is unsurpassed. His classic on educational method and child psychology is complimented by Morgan’s summary of Piaget’s understanding of children’s moral development.

Required Reading:

Recommended Reading: 

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Moral Judgement and Emotional Development in the Child (Piaget & Erikson)

Faculty: Dr. John H. Morgan (Profile)

Description:  Erik Erikson and Jean Piaget are still considered the most important child psychologists in western thought.  This course is designed for both educators and psychologists working with children.  The focus is upon an in-depth analysis of the emerging moral judgement within childhood during the emotional development of personality.  A close look at the life and work of Erikson and Piaget are followed by a systematic recitation and examination of the key concepts of maturation and intellectual judgement developed by both Erikson and Piaget and their relevance to education and counseling psychology today. Professional and pastoral counselors, clinical psychologists and psychotherapists, and child educators constitute the intended audience for this graduate seminar. 

 

Required Reading:
(The student is expected to read both books in their entirety as background reading for the two specified chapters relevant specifically to the weekly assignments in this tutorial). 
Primary Texts: The student is expected to select one primary source from each of these two psychologists and read them in advance of and in preparation for the writing of the required papers. The Primary Texts of Erikson and Piaget at found in the bibliography section of the two required texts for this course.

 

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Near Death Experiences and their Life-Transforming Impact

Faculty: Dr. Ann V. Graber (Profile)

Offered as E-Tutorial, supplemented by telephone discussion.
 
Description: The primary objective of this course is to help lessen the fear of death and dying. To that end, we will look at some near-death experiences described by various individuals; research conducted on NDE’s and related phenomena; and the transformation of consciousness that often follows such experiences. Of particular interest will be how to prepare oneself for a peaceful transition; and, how to be present to others at this stage of spiritual growth on their journey homeward.
 
Required Reading:
  • The Journey Home ~ Preparing for Life’s Ultimate Adventure by Ann V. Graber (2009)    To request a copy of this book, which is provided free of charge to registered student, click here.
  • On Life after Death by Elizabeth Kubler-Ross, M.D.  (1991) 
Recommended Resources:

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On Grief and Bereavement

Faculty: Dr. Ann V. Graber (Profile)

Offered as E-Tutorial, supplemented by telephone discussion.

Description: When we lose someone we love or experience a loss of something that we hold very dear, we tend to fall into a state of grief. Grief can be felt as mental anguish, sorrow or profound sadness. Grief is a normal response to a deeply felt loss. Bereavement is the process of grieving and mourning such losses. Grief is a singular, often lonely experience for each person. No two people grieve alike. Their uniquely individual grieving process must be respected to foster healing after their loss.
 
Required Reading:  
Supplemental Reading: (Recommended, not required)  

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Pastoral Issues in Clinical Psychology

Faculty: Dr. John H. Morgan (Profile)

Description:  This tutorial is designed for professional practitioners, whether ordained or a licensed practitioner, and those interested in the field of pastoral care and counseling. Clinical Pastoral Psychology is the study and treatment of dysfunctions in interpersonal relationships within the context of a spiritual worldview and ethos which provides a values-based framework for analysis and therapy and consists of three components, i.e., the clinical which involves case studies, the pastoral which embraces a spiritual worldview and ethos, and psychology which employs behavioral science assessment and treatment modalities in professional practice.  As a professional field, Clinical Pastoral Psychology is the study of emotional distress and mental illness employing behavioral science assessment tools informed by a spiritual worldview and ethos within a values-based framework for therapeutic treatment. 

Required Reading: (Available from the GTF.)
Recommended But Not Required Background Reading: (Available from the GTF.)

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Pastoral Logotherapy I: Introduction

Faculty: Dr. Jeremiah Murasso Offered as E-Tutorial, without telephone discussion. (Profile)

or by special request with Dr. Ann V. Graber Offered as E-Tutorial, supplemented by telephone discussion. (Profile

Description: Beginning with an historical introduction, the course presents the underlying philosophy, personality theory, and psychotherapy formulated by Viktor E. Frankl, MD, PhD. Dr. Frankl’s logotherapy emphasizes the significance of the human spirit, the uniqueness and dignity of the human being, and meaning in life as the primary motivation for living. Logotherapy’s relevance to pastoral counseling will be highlighted in this course.

Required Reading:

  • Handbook: Introduction to Pastoral Logotherapy * (based on An Introduction to Logotherapy by Robert C. Barnes, revised for Pastoral Logotherapy by Ann V. Graber)
  • Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl.
  • Recollections - an Autobiography by Viktor E. Frankl

* Texts indicated by an asterisk will be sent to students free of charge as pdf files following registration.

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Pastoral Logotherapy II: General Applications

Faculty: Dr. Randy L. Scraper (Profile)

Description:  This course will cover general applications of the principles and techniques of Logotherapy: self-distancing, de-reflection, Socratic dialogue, paradoxical intention, and phenomenological existential methods used to facilitate change in attitude, personal growth, and gaining greater self-knowledge through life-review and life pre-view.  Logotherapy’s relevance to pastoral counseling will be highlighted in this course.

Required Reading:

  • Instructional Manual: General Applications of Pastoral Logotherapy by Dr. Randy L. Scraper (This is a pdf document available for download from the syllabus after registration)
  • The Will to Meaning by Viktor Frankl (Available at Amazon.com)
  • The Unheard Cry for Meaning by Viktor Frank  (Available at Amazon.com)

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Pastoral Logotherapy III: Reflection on Fundamental Areas of Life

Faculty: Dr. Jeremiah Murasso Offered as E-Tutorial, without telephone discussion. (Profile)

Description: This course will focus on vital areas of interest to pastoral care givers and invite reflection on these fundamentals of human existence: The meaning of Life, Death, Suffering, Work, and Love. Further exploration of the medicine chest of logotherapy with wholeness and self-transcending growth as therapeutic goals, as well as application of logotherapy in crisis intervention will be covered.

Required Reading:

  • Instructional Manual: Pastoral Logotherapy -- Reflection on Fundamental Areas of Life *
  • The Doctor and the Soul by Viktor Frankl
  • Synchronization in Birkenwald * by Viktor Frankl
  • Any additional pertinent texts assigned by the Instructor

* Texts indicated by an asterisk will be sent to students free of charge as pdf files following registration.

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Pastoral Logotherapy IV: Assist in Man’s Search for Ultimate Meaning

Faculty: Dr. Ann V. Graber (Profile)

Offered as E-Tutorial, supplemented by telephone discussion.

Description: Further logotherapeutic approaches to facilitate growth and transformation through activation of creative, experiential and attitudinal values will be presented. Overcoming meaninglessness, despondency and despair in the unavoidable vicissitudes of life will be addressed. The focus will be on activating client's inner strengths, choosing life with meaning that leads to psycho-spiritual well-being and reaches toward ultimate meaning – God.    

Required Reading: 

  • Man’s Search for Ultimate Meaning by Viktor Frankl
  • The Feeling of Meaninglessness by Viktor Frankl
  • Viktor Frankl’s Logotherapy: Method of Choice in Ecumenical Pastoral Psychology * by Ann V. Graber
  • Any pertinent supplemental materials suggested by the instructor or selected by the student

* Texts indicated by an asterisk will be sent to students free of charge as pdf files following registration.

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Personal Meaning and Spiritual Wholeness

Faculty: Dr. John H. Morgan (Profile)

Description: This course is designed for those interested in reading and discussing the works of the leading figures of the 20th century. The emphasis will be upon the concept of "meaning" as relates to the purpose and direction of personal existence and the pursuit of spiritual well-being. The student will read a major text in the field which consists of a careful analysis of the key thinkers, followed by three classic texts of the student's choice related to the assigned readings for each of six 500-word essays.

Required Reading:

Recommended Reading: 

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Preventing Church Conflict

Faculty: Dr. Mary Kendall Hope (Profile)

This E-Tutorial explores the skills and concepts needed to assist a pastor or evangelical leader in preventing church conflict and promoting church growth. This course can further benefit the individual seeking practices that will meet the challenges of a current church conflict. The congregational behavior patterns that lead to church conflict are explored with an emphasis on methods to both decrease destructive behavior and prevention methods for further conflict. The five practices that lead to church growth are explored as a holistic approach to the long-term prevention of church conflict.

Required Reading:

Recommended Reading:

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Private Practice: Considering a Counseling Career

Faculty: Dr. John H. Morgan Karl Mannheim Professor of the History & Philosophy of the Social Sciences (Profile)

TUTORIAL DESCRIPTION: 
This E-Tutorial is designed for clergy and ministry professionals, both ordained and laity, who are considering launching a counseling career with special attention to clergy who are involved in parish ministry.  The course will explore the why, how, and when of making the transition from parish ministry to private practice and will discuss in detail the relevant components of this re-definition of ministry from the parish to therapeutic counseling as a profession.  
 
REQUIRED TEXTS:  
RECOMMENDED TEXT: 

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Psychoanalysis and the Whole Person

Faculty: Dr. John H. Morgan (Profile)

Description: This is an introductory course for the uninitiated student in the general field of depth psychology. From the concept of the pleasure principle to the reality principle as developed by Sigmund Freud, the student will be introduced to the fundamental ingredients in modern psychoanalytic theory. The student will read a major classic by Freud in the field within the context of a discussion of the major points in Morgan’s book.

Readings: 

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The Psychoanalytic Feminine Psychology Of Karen Horney, MD

Faculty: Dr. Ann-Marie Neale (Profile)

Premise: Dr. Karen Horney (pronounced Horn-eye) was one of the most prominent and well-respected psychiatrists, psychoanalytic therapists and personality theorists of the twentieth century. She was one of the first female psychoanalytic personality theorists to publically challenge the traditional (Freudian) psychoanalytic explanation for female personality development. In addition, Dr. Horney was a pioneer in the recognition that cultural influences are significant factors in understanding early human development as well as subsequent behavior and motivation. She also differed from traditional psychoanalytic theorists in her emphasis on present day circumstances rather than childhood. Karen Horney’s significant Mature Theory of Personality which examines the importance of self in relation to others is covered in the e-course: The Mature Personality Theory of Karen Horney, MD. 

This course will focus on Dr. Horney’s disagreement with Sigmund Freud and the leading psychoanalysts of her era regarding female personality development. In addition, students will have the opportunity to read her thoughts on the role of culture in determining personality development as well as neurosis in adult women. Her book New Ways in Psychoanalysis published in 1939 was not well received by traditional Freudian personality theorists in her professional circle. In fact, in 1941, as a direct result of the publication of this controversial book, Dr. Horney was asked to leave the New York Psychoanalytic Institute where she was a respected trainer, mentor and therapist. Despite her differences with Sigmund Freud, she remained an advocate of psychoanalytic personality theory and traditional psychoanalysis. Some of Dr. Horney’s writings may seem out-dated to present day readers; nevertheless, they were both innovative and challenging at the time and had significant impact on the development of modern day understanding of female personality development. Remember that the required readings for this course were written from 1922 through 1939; therefore, if you are interested in the history of modern feminist theory and are willing to “suspend your disbelief” about traditional psychoanalytic explanations for female development, I believe you will find them fascinating, challenging and historically significant.
 
Recommended but not required: Dr. John Morgan’s e-course: “Sigmund Freud and Psychoanalysis.”
For further understanding of the theories of Sigmund Freud, students are encouraged to read any of his books on personality theory and development, especially A General Introduction to Psychoanalysis.
 

 
 
Required Textbooks: Both are available on Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com. New Ways in Psychoanalysis is also available on Nook and Kindle.
  • Horney, Karen M.D. Feminine Psychology. (New York: W.W. Norton and Company, Inc., 1967)
  • Horney, Karen M.D. New Ways in Psychoanalysis.  (New York: W.W. Norton and Company, Inc., 1966) 
Recommended Readings (not required for this course): All are available on Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com 
  • http://plaza.ufl.edu/bjparis/ikhs/index.html: This web-site contains informative articles about Dr. Horney’s theory and her contribution to the field. These are available free of charge for download in PDF format. 
  • Horney, Karen. NEUROSIS AND HUMAN GROWTH: The Struggle Toward Self-Realization (New York: W.W. Norton and Company, Inc., 1991) 
  • Horney, Karen M.D. Self-Analysis. (New York: W.W. Norton and Company, Inc., 1970) 
  • Horney, Karen M.D. The Neurotic Personality of our Time. (New York: W.W. Norton and Company, Inc., 1964) 
  • Horney, Karen. OUR INNER CONFLICTS: A Constructive Theory of Neurosis (New York: W.W. Norton and Company, Inc., 1992) 
  • Paris, Bernard J. Karen Horney: Psychoanalyst’s Search for Self-Understanding. (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1994) 
  • Quinn, Susan. A Mind Of Her Own: The Life of Karen Horney. (Plunkett Lake: Plunkett Lake Press, 2011)
  • [This is only available on Nook or Kindle]

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Psychology of Religion: Its History and Theories I

Faculty: Dr. John H. Morgan (Profile)

Note: This two-course sequence is valued at 2 Units of Study. However, if a student takes only one of the two courses, either I or II, the single course is valued at 1 Unit of Study.

Description: This is a two-sequence course, Psychology of Religion I and Psychology of Religion II, and is designed to be an in-depth exposure to the rise of the discipline of the psychology of religion by way of exploring the history and theories of major books that became classics in this field. It is the argument in the course that these books constituted the establishment of the discipline of the psychology of religion and we will explore the topic as developed through these texts. Psychology of Religion I requires reading of the first five chapters of the primary text which covers William James, James Leuba, Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung, and David Roberts. Psychology of Religion II requires reading of the last five chapters of the primary text which covers Gordon Allport, Eric Fromm, Otto Rank, David Banak, and Abraham Maslow. In each of these two courses, the student will select one major text for a careful and thorough reading beyond Morgan’s primary text. 

Required Reading:

Additionally, the student must select and read one of the following classic texts considered in Morgan’s book. These are available from Amazon.com and other online book services. It is the student’s responsibility to secure the required texts.

  • William James (1902) and The Varieties of Religious Experience        
  • James H. Leuba (1915) and The Psychological Origin and Nature of Religion
  • Sigmund Freud (1927) and The Future of an Illusion
  • Carl Jung (1938) and Psychology and Religion
  • David E. Roberts (1950) and Psychotherapy and a Christian View of Man

Recommended Reading: 

 

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Psychology of Religion: Its History and Theories II

Faculty: Dr. John H. Morgan (Profile)

Note: This two-course sequence is valued at 2 Units of Study. However, if a student takes only one of the two courses, either I or II, the single course is valued at 1 Unit of Study.

Description: This is a two-sequence course, Psychology of Religion I and Psychology of Religion II, and is designed to be an in-depth exposure to the rise of the discipline of the psychology of religion by way of exploring the history and theories of major books that became classics in this field. It is the argument in the course that these books constituted the establishment of the discipline of the psychology of religion and we will explore the topic as developed through these texts. Psychology of Religion I requires reading of the first five chapters of the primary text which covers William James, James Leuba, Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung, and David Roberts. Psychology of Religion II requires reading of the last five chapters of the primary text which covers Gordon Allport, Eric Fromm, Otto Rank, David Banak, and Abraham Maslow. In each of these two courses, the student will select one major text for a careful and thorough reading beyond Morgan’s primary text. 

Required Reading:

Additionally, the student must select and read one of the following classic texts considered in Morgan’s book. These are available from Amazon.com and other online book services. It is the student’s responsibility to secure the required texts.

  • Gordon Allport (1950) and The Individual and His Religion
  • Eric Fromm (1950) and Psychoanalysis and Religion
  • Otto Rank (1932/1950 Eng. trans.) and Psychology and the Soul
  • David Bakan (1958) and Sigmund Freud and the Jewish Mystical Tradition
  • Abraham Maslow (1964) and Religion, Values, and Peak-Experiences

Recommended Reading: 

 

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Sigmund Freud and Psychoanalysis

Faculty: Dr. John H. Morgan (Profile)

Description: This tutorial is designed to acquaint the student with Sigmund Freud and the fundamentals of his thought. Rather than settle for merely a secondary-source summary of who he was and what he thought, this course will concentrate on Freud’s life and, by using a classic text, will explore the essentials of his thought. The introductory material presented in Morgan’s chapter on Freud is a way of establishing the parameters of the tutorial. The biography is an in-depth look at Freud’s life. The classic text is a primary source to expose the student to Freud himself.

Required Reading:

Recommended Reading: 

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Spiritual Shepherding - A Logotherapeutic Approach to Pastoral Care

Faculty: Dr.Randy L. Scraper (Profile)

Description: The purpose of this tutorial is to help the student gain a working understanding of spiritual shepherding as a viable Logotherapeutic approach to pastoral care.  The course will examine the fundamental understanding of Logotherapy, the origination and use of “the three ways” of Christian spiritual development and the development of a meaning matrix that flows from the combination of these two understandings of the human spirit and the Christian spiritual life.

Required Textbooks:
  • Franklian Psychology and Christian Spiritual Formation by Randy L. Scraper (2009) (Wyndham Hall – E book available.)
  • Viktor Frankl’s Logotherapy by Ann V. Graber (2004) (Wyndham Hall)
Recommended Readings 
  • Spiritual Passages by Benedict J. Groeschel
  • Mysticism by Evelyn Underhill
  • Jesus as Counselor (Provided free of charge by the Graduate Theological Foundation at the time of course registration)

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The Unconscious God

Faculty: Dr. Randy L. Scraper (Profile)

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The purpose of this tutorial is to acquaint the student with Frankl’s thought pertaining to the relationship between psychotherapy and theology.  The student will examine 1) the essence of existential analysis; 2) the spiritual unconscious; 3) the existential analysis of conscience; 4) the existential analysis of dreams; 5) the transcendent quality of conscience; 6) unconscious religiousness; 7) psychotherapy and theology; 8) the growth of this research during the growth of Logotherapy in the latter part of the twentieth century. 

REQUIRED READINGS:

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The Unheard Cry For Meaning

Faculty: Dr. Randy L. Scraper (Profile)

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The purpose of this tutorial is to acquaint the student with Frankl’s thought pertaining to the relationship between psychotherapy and humanism.  The student will examine the tenets of Logotherapy and their relationships with one another and with the tenets of humanism. This will include: 1) the will to meaning; 2) a meaningful life; 3) determinism and humanism; 4) pure encounter; 5) the dehumanization of sex; 6) sports as the asceticism of today; 7) temporality and mortality; and 8) paradoxical intention and dereflection.  By the conclusion of this course the student will have a working knowledge of the relationship between Logotherapy and humanism.

REQUIRED READINGS:

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Viktor Frankl and Logotherapy

Faculty: Dr. John H. Morgan (Profile)

Description: This tutorial is designed to acquaint the student with Viktor Frankl and the fundamentals of his thought. Rather than settle for merely a secondary-source summary of who he was and what he thought, this course will concentrate on Frankl’s life and, by using a classic text, will explore the essentials of his thought. The introductory material presented in Morgan’s chapter on Frankl is a way of establishing the parameters of the tutorial. The biography is an in-depth look at Frankl’s life. The classic text is a primary source to expose the student to Frankl himself.

Required Reading:
Recommended Reading: 

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Viktor Frankl’s Logotherapy and Twelve Step Programs of Recovery

Faculty: Dr. Ann-Marie Neale (Profile)

Premise: The purpose of this e-tutorial is to show the similarities and differences in the philosophies inherent in Logotherapy and the 12 Steps Programs of recovery from alcohol or other addictions. Students who enroll would benefit from having had some background in Franklian Psychology either through our Pastoral Logotherapy Program or other e-tutorials offered by GTF faculty or through their own study and readings. Knowledge of 12 Step programs would be an asset but is not a requirement. Students will not only read and study these two programs; they will also read a two act play which is a fictionalized account of a meeting in the Afterlife between the founders of Alcoholics Anonymous and Dr. Viktor Frankl. 

One of the major tenets of Franklian Psychology, also known as Logotherapy, and Existential Analysis is that we can find meaning through our attitude in the face of unavoidable pain, guilt or death. In addition, Dr. Frankl teaches that meaning is found through self transcendence and that happiness is a by-product of doing something for others, for the world and for the good of humankind. He maintained that it is Life that demands something from each of us- something unique that only each individual can offer. It is our responsibility to answer this challenge from life.
 
People who are in recovery from alcohol, drugs or other addictions as well as family and friends of these individuals often find sobriety and meaning through participation in 12 –Step Recovery Programs such as Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous, Overeaters Anonymous, Gamblers Anonymous and Alanon Family Groups. In addition to attending meetings, members actively practice the 12 Steps of Recovery which are a group of principles, spiritual in nature, which not only help sufferers maintain sobriety and stay away from their addiction, but also guide them in service to others that they may find a happy and fulfilled life again.
 

 
 
Required Textbooks: Both are available on Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com as well as on Nook and Kindle. 
  • Alcoholics Anonymous, 4th Ed. (2001). New York City: Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc. [3rd Edition is acceptable although page numbers will not be the same; chapters & appendices as well as content (some stories which are not required are different) are identical.]
  •  Frankl, V. (1984). Man’s search for meaning: An introduction to Logotherapy (3rd Ed.). New York: Simon & Schuster. [Later editions are acceptable. Be sure to purchase one that has Parts Two and Three.]
  •  Required Play: Available from Graduate Theological Foundation after registration for course.
  •  Neale, A. M. (2009). The Heavenly Group: We are not saints. Unpublished manuscript.

Recommended Readings (not required for this course): All are available on Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com 

  • Alcoholics Anonymous comes of age: A brief history of A.A. (1985) New York City: Alcoholics Anonymous World Service.
  • Alcoholics Anonymous Pamphlet (1941)The Jack Alexander Article about AA” New York City: Alcoholics Anonymous World Service, Inc.
  • As Bill sees it: The AA way of life (1967). New York City: Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc.
  • Bergman, S, & Surrey, J. (2007). “Bill W. and Dr. Bob: The original off-broadway production,” Northern Light Productions. Center City, Minn.: Hazelden.
  • Brown D. & Brown S. (2001). Mrs. Marty Mann: The first lady of alcoholics anonymous. Minnesota: Hazelden.
  • Cheever, S. (2004). My name is Bill. New York: Washington Square Press.
  • Courage to change: One day at a time in Alanon II (1992). Virginia Beach, VA: Alanon Family Group Headquarters, Inc.     
  • Frankl, V. E. (2000). Man’s search for ultimate meaning. Cambridge, Mass,: Basic Books.
  • Frankl, V. E. (2004). On the theory and therapy of mental disorders. New York, NY: Brunner-Routledge.
  • Frankl, V. E. (1986). The doctor and the soul. New York: Vintage Books.
  • Frankl, V. E. (2010). The feeling of meaninglessness. Wisconsin: Marguette University Press.
  • Frankl, V. (1988). The will to meaning: Foundations and applications of Logotherapy (Exp. Ed.). New York: Meridian.
  • Graber, A. V. (2004). Viktor Frankl’s Logotherapy (2nd Ed.): Method of choice in ecumenical pastoral psychology. Lima, Ohio: Wyndham Hall Press.
  • How Alanon works for families and friends of alcoholics. (1995). Virginia Beach, VA: Alanon Family Group Headquarters, Inc.
  • James, W. (2002). The varieties of religious experience. New York: The Modern Library.
  • Kurtz, E. & Ketcham, K. (2002). The spirituality of imperfection: Storytelling and the search for meaning. New York: Bantam Books.
  • Living sober: some methods A.A. members have used for not drinking. (1998). New York City: Alcoholics Anonymous World Service.
  • Mitchell, D. (2002). Silkworth: The little doctor who loved drunks. Center City, Minn.: Hazelden.
  • Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions (1981). New York City: Alcoholics Anonymous World Service, Inc.

 

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Violence against Women and Children I

Faculty: Dr. Anthony O. Nwachukwu (Profile)

Description: 1. Violence is a universal issue. Discuss? 2. Explicate the nature of violence you have encountered in your country as such? 3. Is any form of violence justifiable? 4. Women and children are vulnerable in society. Why? 5. Comment on the possible factors that bring about violence in society? 6. There are some measures that can be taken to stop violence against women and children. Do you agree?

Required Reading:

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Violence against Women and Children II

Faculty: Dr. Anthony O. Nwachukwu (Profile)

Description: 1. Has your local church or government played any major role to stop violence against women and children? 2. Give a dimensional approach to this issue and why do you feel that way? 3. The biblical position on violence against humanity is a matter of great concern. Explain?4. "Man is a wolf to man" - Thomas Hobbes. To what extent can one justify the above statement with particular reference to the issue at hand? 5. Violence seems to be against women and children and not men. In your own opinion, why are they excluded in this discussion or debate today? 6. Can the Ministers of the Gospel Message be involved in any form of violence?

Required Reading:

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The Will to Meaning

Faculty: Dr. Randy L. Scraper (Profile)

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The purpose of this tutorial is to acquaint the student with the foundations and applications of Logotherapy.  The student will learn how Frankl’s Logotherapy rests on a three-part foundation: 1) the freedom of the will; 2) the will to meaning; and 3) the meaning of life.  Freedom of the will discusses issues of determinism and pan-determinism.  The will to meaning is examined in relationship to the will to pleasure and the will to power.  Finally, the meaning of life is examined in relationship to relativism and subjectivism.  Upon conclusion of this course, the student will have a working understanding of the foundations and applications of Logotherapy. 

REQUIRED READINGS:

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Women’s Journey Into Alcohol Abuse or Addiction

Faculty: Dr. Ann-Marie Neale (Profile)

Premise: Alcohol is a socially acceptable drug in our modern society. This fact does not detract from alcohol’s popularity. Nor is this fact a criticism of alcohol or those who consume it.  However, potential and actual alcohol abuse and addiction continues to be a serious problem for women of all ages. Although the stigma attached to alcoholism is not as great for women today as it was a generation ago; nevertheless,  this stigma still exists and influences how and if women seek treatment when they see that excessive alcohol consumption has become a problem in their lives.  One way to understand this growing problem is through the poignant and powerful stories of two professional women (A Psychologist and a Writer/Editor) who grappled with their own alcohol addiction.  This course is not just for women or for addiction counselors.  The course also provides important information for chaplains, clergy, educators, friends and family members who seek to better understand and be helpful to the many women who find themselves in trouble with alcohol. The two women who share their stories discuss the many avenues that women pursue in search of sobriety. Stephanie Brown discusses Alcoholics Anonymous and Alanon Twelve Step Recovery Programs from a woman’s perspective.
 
Required Textbooks:  Both are available on Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com
(They are also available in e-book format) 
  • Brown, Stephanie. (2004). A Place Called Self: Women, Sobriety, and Radical Transformation. Minnesota: Hazelden 
  • Johnston, Ann Dowsett. (2013). Drink: The Intimate Relationship Between Women and Alcohol. New York: HarperCollins 
Recommended Readings: Not required for the course
(All are available on Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com) 
  • Alcoholics Anonymous (Fourth Edition). (2001).  New York: Alcoholics Anonymous World Services. 
  • Brown, S. & Brown, D. (2001) Mrs. Marty Mann: The First Lady of Alcoholics Anonymous. Minnesota:  Hazelden. 
  • Cheever, S. (1999). Note Found in a Bottle: A Memoir. New York: Washington Square Press. 
  • Covington, S. (1994). A Woman’s Way Through the Twelve Steps. Minnesota: Hazelden. 
  • Jersild, D. (2001). Happy Hours: Alcohol in a Woman’s Life. New York: HarperCollins. 
  • Epstein, L. O. & Gerszberg, C. O. (Eds). Drinking Diaries: Women Serve Their Stories Straight Up. California: Seal Press. 
  • Fisher, C. (2008). Wishful Drinking. New York: Simon and Schuster. 
  • Ketcham, K. & Ashbury, W. F. (2000). Beyond the Influence: Understanding and Defeating Alcoholism. New York: Bantam Books. 
  • Knapp, C. (1996)  Drinking: A Love Story. New York: The Dial Press. 
  • Lamott, A. (1999). Traveling Mercies: Some Thoughts on Faith. New York: Anchor Books.  
  • The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University. (2006). Women Under The Influence. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press.

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