Pastoral Logotherapy



Classical Schools of Psychotherapy

Faculty: Dr. John H. Morgan (Profile)

Description: This tutorial is designed to introduce the student or, in the case of the student already familiar with some or all of the theorists discussed here, to refresh the student’s memory of the major systems of classical thought in psychotherapy. The course will consist of three components in the treatment of each system of thought; namely, the biography of the theorist, the key aspects of his theoretical constructs, and a major text in each particular school of thought. Because there are eight schools of thought considered in the text and only six papers required for this course, the student may select the six theorists of most interest and write a 500-word paper on each of those six.

Required Reading:

  • Clinical Psychotherapy: A History of Theory and Practice by John H. Morgan.
  • PRIMARY SOURCE RECOMMENDED READINGS: The required text listed above gives a comprehensive bibliography for each of the eight schools of psychotherapy considered in this course. The student should select two texts from one or more of the schools of thought discussed in the required text. The theorists discussed are Sigmund Freud, Alfred Adler, Carl Jung, Viktor Frankl, Erik Erikson, Abraham Maslow, Carl Rogers, and Harry Stack Sullivan.

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Discovering Meaning in Marriage

Faculty: Andrew P. Spore, D.Min., Visiting Professor of Pastoral Logotherapy (Profile)

Description:  This E-Tutorial will equip students to use the logotherapeutic premarital counseling protocol, Discovering Meaning in Marriage.  “Marriage offers an ideal arena in which to discover meaning…  A logotherapeutic approach to marital preparation may serve to strengthen this fragile institution by preparing couples to discover meaning in and through it” (from the introduction to Discovering Meaning in Marriage: A Logotherapeutic Approach to Premarital Counseling, by Andrew P. Spore).  Students will explore important relationship concepts from a specifically Franklian perspective.  In particular, they will reflect on the role of meaning discovery in love and intimacy, and they will learn to communicate to couples the importance of living responsibly in the marriage relationship.  Additionally, the foundation laid by this tutorial will provide counselors with valuable resources for working with couples who are already married. 

Required Reading:  
Recommended Reading: 

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Pastoral Logotherapy I: Introduction - with Dr. Murasso

Faculty: Dr. Jeremiah Murasso Offered as E-Tutorial, without telephone discussion. (Profile)

or by special request with Dr. Ann V. Graber Offered as E-Tutorial, supplemented by telephone discussion. (Profile

Description: Beginning with an historical introduction, the course presents the underlying philosophy, personality theory, and psychotherapy formulated by Viktor E. Frankl, MD, PhD. Dr. Frankl’s logotherapy emphasizes the significance of the human spirit, the uniqueness and dignity of the human being, and meaning in life as the primary motivation for living. Logotherapy’s relevance to pastoral counseling will be highlighted in this course.

Required Reading:

  • Handbook: Introduction to Pastoral Logotherapy * (based on An Introduction to Logotherapy by Robert C. Barnes, revised for Pastoral Logotherapy by Ann V. Graber)
  • Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl.
  • Recollections - an Autobiography by Viktor E. Frankl

* Texts indicated by an asterisk will be sent to students free of charge as pdf files following registration.

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Pastoral Logotherapy III: Reflection on Fundamental Areas of Life

Faculty: Dr. Jeremiah Murasso Offered as E-Tutorial, without telephone discussion. (Profile)

Description: This course will focus on vital areas of interest to pastoral care givers and invite reflection on these fundamentals of human existence: The meaning of Life, Death, Suffering, Work, and Love. Further exploration of the medicine chest of logotherapy with wholeness and self-transcending growth as therapeutic goals, as well as application of logotherapy in crisis intervention will be covered.

Required Reading:

  • Instructional Manual: Pastoral Logotherapy -- Reflection on Fundamental Areas of Life *
  • The Doctor and the Soul by Viktor Frankl
  • Synchronization in Birkenwald * by Viktor Frankl
  • Any additional pertinent texts assigned by the Instructor

* Texts indicated by an asterisk will be sent to students free of charge as pdf files following registration.

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Pastoral Logotherapy IV: Assist in Man’s Search for Ultimate Meaning - with Dr. Murasso

Faculty: Dr. Jeremiah N. Murasso (Profile)

Also offered with Rev. Dr. Randy Scraper (Profile) or with Dr. Ann Graber (Profile) if requested.

Description: Further logotherapeutic approaches to facilitate growth and transformation through activation of creative, experiential and attitudinal values will be presented. Overcoming meaninglessness, despondency and despair in the unavoidable vicissitudes of life will be addressed. The focus will be on activating client's inner strengths, choosing life with meaning that leads to psycho-spiritual well-being and reaches toward ultimate meaning – God.    

Required Reading: 

  • Man’s Search for Ultimate Meaning by Viktor Frankl
  • The Feeling of Meaninglessness by Viktor Frankl
  • Viktor Frankl’s Logotherapy: Method of Choice in Ecumenical Pastoral Psychology * by Ann V. Graber
  • Yes to Life In Spite of Everything by Viktor E. Frankl (2019)
  • Any pertinent supplemental materials suggested by the instructor or selected by the student

* Texts indicated by an asterisk will be sent to students free of charge as pdf files following registration.

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Franklian Psychology and Christian Spiritual Formation

Faculty: Dr. Randy L. Scraper (Profile)

Description: The purpose of this tutorial is to acquaint the student with the ways in which Viktor Frankl’s Logotherapy and Logo philosophy interact with Christian Spiritual Formation. The student will learn how Franklian psychology provides one axis of a meaning matrix that helps pastors and educators better understand Christian spiritual maturity. The primary texts expose Dr. Frankl’s mature thinking on the subjects of ultimate meaning and how his life and work continue to benefit a meaningful understanding of the human spirit. Dr. Scraper’s book defines and describes the origination and use of a meaning matrix that includes Franklian psychology in better understanding Christian spiritual maturity.

Required Reading:

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Meaningful Living for a Healthier Life

Faculty: Dr. Randy L. Scraper (Profile)

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The purpose of this tutorial is to acquaint the student with Frankl’s thought pertaining to the discovery of meaning in life and the ability to apply that meaning to life in a way that promotes greater health.  The application is presented by Dr. Frankl’s protégé, Elisabeth Lukas. 

REQUIRED READINGS:

  • Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl (1959) (Washington Square Press)
  • The Therapist and the Soul by Elisabeth Lukas (2015) (Purpose Research)
  • Viktor Frankl Recollections - An Autobiography by Viktor E. Frankl (1997) (Plenum)

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Meaningful Prayer I – A Logotherapeutic Approach to Prayer for Guidance, Direction, and Purpose in Life

Faculty: Dr. Randy L. Scraper (Profile)

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The purpose of this tutorial is to help the student gain a working understanding of meaningful prayer as a viable Logotherapeutic approach to guidance and direction through prayer and Christian spiritual maturity. The course will examine the fundamental understanding of Logotherapy, the theological understanding of “the three ways” of Christian spiritual development and their relationship to the meaning matrix that flows from the combination of these two understandings of the human spirit and the Christian spiritual life of meaningful prayer. The student will gain an understanding of the theory and practice of meaningful prayer as a Logotherapeutic approach to guidance and direction for finding purpose in life. 

REQUIRED READINGS: (Selected Chapters)
  • Man’s Search for Ultimate Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl (2000) (Perseus – ISBN 0-7382-0354-8)
  • Franklian Psychology and Christian Spiritual Formation by Randy L. Scraper (2009) (Wyndham Hall – E book available.)
  • Viktor Frankl’s Logotherapy by Ann V. Graber (2004) (Wyndham Hall)

SUGGESTED READINGS:

  • Spiritual Passages by Benedict J. Groeschel
  • Mysticism by Evelyn Underhill

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Meaningful Prayer II – A Logotherapeutic Approach to Healing Prayer

Faculty: Dr. Randy L. Scraper (Profile)

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The purpose of this tutorial is to help the student gain a working understanding of meaningful prayer as a viable Logotherapeutic approach to healing prayer and Christian spiritual maturity. (Familiarity with a fundamental understanding of Logotherapy, the theological understanding of “the three ways” of Christian spiritual development and their relationship to the meaning matrix that flows from the combination of these two understandings of the human spirit and the Christian spiritual life of meaningful prayer will be most helpful. Meaningful Prayer I or Spiritual Shepherding would be helpful prerequisite courses although any course on Viktor Frankl’s Logotherapy would be helpful.)

The student will gain an understanding of the theory and practice of meaningful prayer as a Logotherapeutic approach to healing prayer.
 
REQUIRED READINGS: (Selected Chapters)
  • Finding Sanctuary by Abbot Christopher Jamison (2006) (Liturgical Press – ISBN 978-0-8146-3263-5)
  • Franklian Psychology and Christian Spiritual Formation by Randy L. Scraper (2009) (Wyndham Hall – E book available. – ISBN 978-1-55605-394-8)
  • Meaning in Suffering by Elisabeth Lukas (Institute of Logotherapy Press – ISBN 0-917867-05-X)
SUGGESTED READINGS:
  • Spiritual Passages by Benedict J. Groeschel
  • Mysticism by Evelyn Underhill 

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Near Death Experiences and their Life-Transforming Impact

Faculty: Dr. Ann V. Graber (Profile)

Offered as E-Tutorial, supplemented by telephone discussion.
 
Description: The primary objective of this course is to help lessen the fear of death and dying. To that end, we will look at research conducted on Near Death Experiences (NDEs) and related phenomena and the interface of science and spirituality that is immerging. We will listen to some near-death experiences described by various individuals and the transformation of consciousness that often follows such experiences. Of particular interest will be how to prepare oneself for a peaceful transition and how to be present to others as they approach the end of life – not with trepidation, but with better understanding of the journey home.
 
Required Reading:
  • The Journey Homeby Ann V. Graber (2009). Charlottsville, VA: Purpose Research.
  • On Life after Death by Elizabeth Kubler-Ross, M.D. (1991) Berkeley, CA: Celestial Arts.
Audio-Visual Resources:
  • As listed in the Syllabus for this E-Tutorial 
Recommended Resources:

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On Grief and Bereavement

Faculty: Dr. Ann V. Graber (Profile)

Offered as E-Tutorial, supplemented by telephone discussion.

Description: When we lose someone we love or experience a loss of something that we hold very dear, we tend to fall into a state of grief. Grief can be felt as mental anguish, sorrow or profound sadness. Grief is a normal response to a deeply felt loss. Bereavement is the process of grieving and mourning such losses. Grief is a singular, often lonely experience for each person. No two people grieve alike. Their uniquely individual grieving process must be respected to foster healing after their loss.
 
Required Reading:  
HIGHLY RECOMMENDED SUPPLEMENTAL RESOURCES:
  • Transcending Grief: Recovering Meaning & Practical Tools for Navigating the Journey Through the World of Loss by Marie S. Dezelic, PhD, Gabriel Ghanoum, PsyD (2020)
  • Any pertinent material of the student’s choice

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Spiritual Shepherding - A Logotherapeutic Approach to Pastoral Care

Faculty: Dr. Randy L. Scraper (Profile)

Description: The purpose of this tutorial is to help the student gain a working understanding of spiritual shepherding as a viable Logotherapeutic approach to pastoral care.  The course will examine the fundamental understanding of Logotherapy, the origination and use of “the three ways” of Christian spiritual development and the development of a meaning matrix that flows from the combination of these two understandings of the human spirit and the Christian spiritual life.

Required Textbooks:
  • Franklian Psychology and Christian Spiritual Formation by Randy L. Scraper (2009) (Wyndham Hall – E book available.)
  • Viktor Frankl’s Logotherapy by Ann V. Graber (2004) (Wyndham Hall)
Recommended Readings 
  • Spiritual Passages by Benedict J. Groeschel
  • Mysticism by Evelyn Underhill
  • Jesus as Counselor (Provided free of charge by the Graduate Theological Foundation at the time of course registration)

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Theories in Logotherapeutic & Meaning-Based Addiction Recovery

Faculty: Daniel A. Franz, PsyD, LMHC, LCAC (Profile)

Dr. Frankl did not consider himself to be an expert in substance abuse, however his theories have long proved helpful in the the treatment of addictions and substance use.  Current research indicates that we still do not have a clear-cut understanding of addiction or it’s treatment. Twelve-step programs, Cognitive Behavior treatment, Behavioral Economics, and Stages of Change theory have all proved helpful in addictions treatment.  This e-course will discuss the latest research in Positive Psychology and Meaning-Based approaches to the treatment of substance abuse and addiction - whether addiction to alcohol, pills, sex, spending, or the internet. Students will gain an understanding of the modern existential vacuum of addiction, and will complete the course with a better understanding of how to help sufferers of addiction discover a meaningful recovery.
 
Required reading: 
  • Wong, L.C.J., Thompson, G.R., & Wong, P.T.P., (2013). The Positive Psychology of Meaning and Addiction Recovery.  Purpose Research, LLC. Charlottesville, Virginia.
  •  Frankl, V. (2006).  Man’s Search for Meaning.  Beacon Press, Boston, Massachusetts.
Recommended Readings 
  • Alcoholics Anonymous, 4th Ed. (2001). New York City: Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc.
  • Dodes, L. (2011). Breaking Addiction: a 7-step handbook for ending any addiction.  Harper Publishing, New York, New York.
  • Hari, J. (2016).  Chasing the Scream: The Opposite of Addiction is Connection.  Bloomsbury USA, London, United Kindgdom.
  • Mate, G. (2010).  In the Realm of Hungry Ghosts: close encounters with addictions.  North Atlantic Books. Berkeley, CA.

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The Unconscious God

Faculty: Dr. Randy L. Scraper (Profile)

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The purpose of this tutorial is to acquaint the student with Frankl’s thought pertaining to the relationship between psychotherapy and theology.  The student will examine 1) the essence of existential analysis; 2) the spiritual unconscious; 3) the existential analysis of conscience; 4) the existential analysis of dreams; 5) the transcendent quality of conscience; 6) unconscious religiousness; 7) psychotherapy and theology; 8) the growth of this research during the growth of Logotherapy in the latter part of the twentieth century. 

REQUIRED READINGS:

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The Unheard Cry For Meaning

Faculty: Dr. Randy L. Scraper (Profile)

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The purpose of this tutorial is to acquaint the student with Frankl’s thought pertaining to the relationship between psychotherapy and humanism.  The student will examine the tenets of Logotherapy and their relationships with one another and with the tenets of humanism. This will include: 1) the will to meaning; 2) a meaningful life; 3) determinism and humanism; 4) pure encounter; 5) the dehumanization of sex; 6) sports as the asceticism of today; 7) temporality and mortality; and 8) paradoxical intention and dereflection.  By the conclusion of this course the student will have a working knowledge of the relationship between Logotherapy and humanism.

REQUIRED READINGS:

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Viktor Frankl’s Logotherapy and Twelve Step Programs of Recovery

Faculty: Dr. Ann-Marie Neale (Profile)

Premise: The purpose of this e-tutorial is to show the similarities and differences in the philosophies inherent in Logotherapy and the 12 Steps Programs of recovery from alcohol or other addictions. Students who enroll would benefit from having had some background in Franklian Psychology either through our Pastoral Logotherapy Program or other e-tutorials offered by GTF faculty or through their own study and readings. Knowledge of 12 Step programs would be an asset but is not a requirement. Students will not only read and study these two programs; they will also read a two act play which is a fictionalized account of a meeting in the Afterlife between the founders of Alcoholics Anonymous and Dr. Viktor Frankl. 

One of the major tenets of Franklian Psychology, also known as Logotherapy, and Existential Analysis is that we can find meaning through our attitude in the face of unavoidable pain, guilt or death. In addition, Dr. Frankl teaches that meaning is found through self transcendence and that happiness is a by-product of doing something for others, for the world and for the good of humankind. He maintained that it is Life that demands something from each of us- something unique that only each individual can offer. It is our responsibility to answer this challenge from life.
 
People who are in recovery from alcohol, drugs or other addictions as well as family and friends of these individuals often find sobriety and meaning through participation in 12 –Step Recovery Programs such as Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous, Overeaters Anonymous, Gamblers Anonymous and Alanon Family Groups. In addition to attending meetings, members actively practice the 12 Steps of Recovery which are a group of principles, spiritual in nature, which not only help sufferers maintain sobriety and stay away from their addiction, but also guide them in service to others that they may find a happy and fulfilled life again.
 

 
 
Required Textbooks: Both are available on Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com as well as on Nook and Kindle. 
  • Alcoholics Anonymous, 4th Ed. (2001). New York City: Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc. [3rd Edition is acceptable although page numbers will not be the same; chapters & appendices as well as content (some stories which are not required are different) are identical.]
  •  Frankl, V. (1984). Man’s search for meaning: An introduction to Logotherapy (3rd Ed.). New York: Simon & Schuster. [Later editions are acceptable. Be sure to purchase one that has Parts Two and Three.]
  •  Required Play: Available from Graduate Theological Foundation after registration for course.
  •  Neale, A. M. (2009). The Heavenly Group: We are not saints. Unpublished manuscript.

Recommended Readings (not required for this course): All are available on Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com 

  • Alcoholics Anonymous comes of age: A brief history of A.A. (1985) New York City: Alcoholics Anonymous World Service.
  • Alcoholics Anonymous Pamphlet (1941)The Jack Alexander Article about AA” New York City: Alcoholics Anonymous World Service, Inc.
  • As Bill sees it: The AA way of life (1967). New York City: Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc.
  • Bergman, S, & Surrey, J. (2007). “Bill W. and Dr. Bob: The original off-broadway production,” Northern Light Productions. Center City, Minn.: Hazelden.
  • Brown D. & Brown S. (2001). Mrs. Marty Mann: The first lady of alcoholics anonymous. Minnesota: Hazelden.
  • Cheever, S. (2004). My name is Bill. New York: Washington Square Press.
  • Courage to change: One day at a time in Alanon II (1992). Virginia Beach, VA: Alanon Family Group Headquarters, Inc.     
  • Frankl, V. E. (2000). Man’s search for ultimate meaning. Cambridge, Mass,: Basic Books.
  • Frankl, V. E. (2004). On the theory and therapy of mental disorders. New York, NY: Brunner-Routledge.
  • Frankl, V. E. (1986). The doctor and the soul. New York: Vintage Books.
  • Frankl, V. E. (2010). The feeling of meaninglessness. Wisconsin: Marguette University Press.
  • Frankl, V. (1988). The will to meaning: Foundations and applications of Logotherapy (Exp. Ed.). New York: Meridian.
  • Graber, A. V. (2004). Viktor Frankl’s Logotherapy (2nd Ed.): Method of choice in ecumenical pastoral psychology. Lima, Ohio: Wyndham Hall Press.
  • How Alanon works for families and friends of alcoholics. (1995). Virginia Beach, VA: Alanon Family Group Headquarters, Inc.
  • James, W. (2002). The varieties of religious experience. New York: The Modern Library.
  • Kurtz, E. & Ketcham, K. (2002). The spirituality of imperfection: Storytelling and the search for meaning. New York: Bantam Books.
  • Living sober: some methods A.A. members have used for not drinking. (1998). New York City: Alcoholics Anonymous World Service.
  • Mitchell, D. (2002). Silkworth: The little doctor who loved drunks. Center City, Minn.: Hazelden.
  • Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions (1981). New York City: Alcoholics Anonymous World Service, Inc.

 

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Viktor Frankl and Logotherapy

Faculty: Dr. Ann Marie Neale (Profile)

Description: This tutorial is designed to acquaint the student with Viktor Frankl and the fundamentals of his thought. Rather than settle for merely a secondary-source summary of who he was and what he thought, this course will concentrate on Frankl’s life and, by using a classic text, will explore the essentials of his thought. The introductory material presented in Morgan’s chapter on Frankl is a way of establishing the parameters of the tutorial. The biography is an in-depth look at Frankl’s life. The classic text is a primary source to expose the student to Frankl himself.

Required Reading:

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The Will to Meaning

Faculty: Dr. Randy L. Scraper (Profile)

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The purpose of this tutorial is to acquaint the student with the foundations and applications of Logotherapy.  The student will learn how Frankl’s Logotherapy rests on a three-part foundation: 1) the freedom of the will; 2) the will to meaning; and 3) the meaning of life.  Freedom of the will discusses issues of determinism and pan-determinism.  The will to meaning is examined in relationship to the will to pleasure and the will to power.  Finally, the meaning of life is examined in relationship to relativism and subjectivism.  Upon conclusion of this course, the student will have a working understanding of the foundations and applications of Logotherapy. 

REQUIRED READINGS:

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Pastoral Logotherapy I: Introduction - with Dr. Graber

Faculty: Dr. Ann Graber (Profile)

This version of the course is supplemented by telephone discussion.

Description: Beginning with an historical introduction, the course presents the underlying philosophy, personality theory, and psychotherapy formulated by Viktor E. Frankl, MD, PhD. Dr. Frankl’s logotherapy emphasizes the significance of the human spirit, the uniqueness and dignity of the human being, and meaning in life as the primary motivation for living. Logotherapy’s relevance to pastoral counseling will be highlighted in this course.

Required Reading:

  • Handbook: Introduction to Pastoral Logotherapy * (based on An Introduction to Logotherapy by Robert C. Barnes, revised for Pastoral Logotherapy by Ann V. Graber)
  • Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl.
  • Recollections - an Autobiography by Viktor E. Frankl

* Texts indicated by an asterisk will be sent to students free of charge as pdf files following registration.

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Pastoral Logotherapy IV: Assist in Man’s Search for Ultimate Meaning - with Dr. Graber

Faculty: Dr. Ann V. Graber (Profile)

Offered as E-Tutorial, supplemented by telephone discussion.

Description: Further logotherapeutic approaches to facilitate growth and transformation through activation of creative, experiential and attitudinal values will be presented. Overcoming meaninglessness, despondency and despair in the unavoidable vicissitudes of life will be addressed. The focus will be on activating client's inner strengths, choosing life with meaning that leads to psycho-spiritual well-being and reaches toward ultimate meaning – God.    

Required Reading: 
  • Man’s Search for Ultimate Meaning by Viktor Frankl
  • The Feeling of Meaninglessness by Viktor Frankl
  • Viktor Frankl’s Logotherapy: Method of Choice in Ecumenical Pastoral Psychology * by Ann V. Graber
  • Any pertinent supplemental materials suggested by the instructor or selected by the student
* Texts indicated by an asterisk will be sent to students free of charge as pdf files following registration.

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Pastoral Logotherapy IV: Assist in Man’s Search for Ultimate Meaning - With Dr. Scraper

Faculty: Dr. Randy Scraper (Profile)

Description: Further logotherapeutic approaches to facilitate growth and transformation through activation of creative, experiential and attitudinal values will be presented. Overcoming meaninglessness, despondency and despair in the unavoidable vicissitudes of life will be addressed. The focus will be on activating client's inner strengths, choosing life with meaning that leads to psycho-spiritual well-being and reaches toward ultimate meaning – God.    

Required Reading: 
  • Man’s Search for Ultimate Meaning by Viktor Frankl
  • The Feeling of Meaninglessness by Viktor Frankl
  • Viktor Frankl’s Logotherapy: Method of Choice in Ecumenical Pastoral Psychology * by Ann V. Graber
  • Any pertinent supplemental materials suggested by the instructor or selected by the student
* Texts indicated by an asterisk will be sent to students free of charge as pdf files following registration.

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Pastoral Logotherapy ll: General Applications of Pastoral Logotherapy

Faculty: Edward Marshall, MD, PhD. (Profile)

Pastoral Logotherapy ll:
General Applications of Pastoral Logotherapy

FACULTY: Edward Marshall, MD, PhD

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course will cover general applications of the principles and techniques of Logotherapy: self-distancing, de-reflection, Socratic dialogue, paradoxical intention, and phenomenological existential methods used to facilitate change in attitude, personal growth, and gaining greater self-knowledge through life-review and life pre-view exercises.  Logotherapy’s relevance to pastoral counseling will be highlighted in this course.

COURSE OVERVIEW (CONTENTS OF INSTRUCTION MANUAL)
Module I
            Overview of the principles and techniques of Logotherapy
            Overview of Pastoral Logotherapy
            General Applications of principles and techniques relating to Pastoral Logotherapy
 
Module II
            Principles that relate to Self-distancing
            Overview of Self-distancing
            Relationship to Pastoral Logotherapy
 
Module III
            Principles that relate to De-reflection
            Overview of De-reflection
            Applications for Pastoral Logotherapy
 
Module IV
            Overview of Socratic Dialogue
            Applications of Socratic Dialogue
            Relevance for Pastoral Logotherapy
 
Module V
            Overview of Paradoxical Intention
            Applications and restrictions for Paradoxical Intention
            Relevance for Pastoral Logotherapy
 
Module VI
            Other useful Phenomenological Existential methods
            Gaining Self Knowledge through Life-review and Life-preview exercises
            Pastoral Logotherapy and Attitudinal Change

REQUIRED READINGS: WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS:
Weekly Papers: Each of the six Modules of this course requires a 500–1000-word reflection paper to the assigned readings and topics covered – ideally from a pastoral counseling perspective,
Final Paper for the course will consist of a compilation of the “edited” papers previously written for Modules I - VI. The final paper should be about 3000-words in length. It is evaluated by the faculty and the student receives a copy of the evaluation and a notice of completion of the course from the Office of the Registrar of the Graduate Theological Foundation.

THE PROCESS:
The student studies the assigned materials and e-mails a 500-1000-word response paper to the faculty member for each of the six Modules, one per week. As per prior agreement, the faculty person will either send reviews of each of the student’s reflection papers by e-mail, or offer a telephone tutorial (1/2 hour for each Module) where the material covered can be discussed and pertinent questions entertained.  At the end of the six sessions, the student submits a final paper, consisting of the six combined 500-word papers, which the student has edited in light of the faculty person’s guidance during the course.
 
Course Outline:
Module I:
Reading Assignment: The Will to Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl (pages vii-x; 3-14).  Instructional Manual: General Applications of Pastoral Logotherapy by Randy L. Scraper (Module I).  The Unheard Cry for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl (pages 13-43).
Writing Assignment: The 500 to 1,000-word paper for Module I will reflect on the following topics:  Material covered in the Questions for Reflection at the end of each section and the following questions: How do the principles and techniques of Logotherapy apply to Pastoral Logotherapy?  How is Pastoral Logotherapy a natural extension of Logotherapy?
MODULE II:
Reading Assignment: The Will to Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl (pages vii-x; and 15-49). Instructional Manual: General Applications of Pastoral Logotherapy by Randy L. Scraper (Module II).  The Unheard Cry for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl (pages 44-85).
Writing Assignment:   The 500 to 1,000-word paper for Module II will reflect on the following topics:  Material covered in the Questions for Reflection at the end of each section and the following questions: In what ways have you experiences self-distancing in your life? How do you think that self-distancing can be helpful in Pastoral Logotherapy?
Module III:
Reading Assignment: The Will to Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl (pages 50-98). Instructional Manual: General Applications of Pastoral Logotherapy by Randy L. Scraper (Module III).  The Unheard Cry for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl (pages 86-101).
Writing Assignment: The 500 to 1,000-word paper for Module III will reflect on the following topics:  Material covered in the Questions for Reflection at the end of each section and the following questions: How would you explain the technique of De-reflection?  What would be an indication for the use of De-reflection in a pastoral setting?
Module IV:
Reading Assignment: The Will to Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl (pages 99-116). Instructional Manual: General Applications of Pastoral Logotherapy by Randy L. Scraper (Module IV).  The Unheard Cry for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl (pages 102-113).
Writing Assignment: The 500 to 1,000-word paper for Module IV will reflect on the following topics:  Material covered in the Questions for Reflection at the end of each section and the following questions: What are the essentials of Socratic Dialogue?  How would you envision the positive use of Socratic Dialogue in Pastoral Logotherapy?
module V:
Reading Assignment: The Will to Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl (pages 117-157). ). Instructional Manual: General Applications of Pastoral Logotherapy by Randy L. Scraper (Module V).  The Unheard Cry for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl (pages 114-149).
Writing Assignment: The 500 to 1,000-word paper for Module V will reflect on the following topics:  Material covered in the Questions for Reflection at the end of each section and the following questions:  How would you understand the application of Paradoxical Intention?  When is Paradoxical Intention contra-indicated?  How could you envision using Paradoxical Intention in Pastoral Logotherapy?
module VI:
Reading Assignment: The Will to Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl (pages 158-170). Instructional Manual: General Applications of Pastoral Logotherapy by Randy L. Scraper (Module VI).  The Unheard Cry for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl (pages 150-162).      
Writing Assignment: The 500 to 1,000-word paper for Module VI will reflect on the following topics:  Material covered in the Questions for Reflection at the end of each section and the following questions:  How can Phenomenological Existential methodologies be helpful in better comprehending meaning in life?  What knowledge of yourself have you gained through Life-review and Life-preview exercises? 
Final Paper: After you have reviewed the instructors’ comments and edited your six session papers, combine them into one 3000-word final paper and submit it for review. Failure to submit the final paper within 30 days of the 6th paper deadline will result in a permanent loss of course credit.

FACULTY:
Edward Marshall MD, PhD
Diplomate Clinician in Logotherapy
Viktor E. Frankl Professor of Psychotherapy and Spirituality
Graduate Theological Foundation
Email: edward.marshall.gtf@gmail.com
Cell: +1-613-979-9133

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The Meaning of Love in Relationships

Faculty: Edward Marshall, MD, PhD. (Profile)

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course explores the life and work of Viktor E. Frankl as it relates to meaningful relationships. It reviews the anthropological foundations of logotherapy and the human ability to personally relate to oneself, others, the world (nature) and the transcendent.
Through reflective questions, the student is invited to participate in a discovery of the relational aspects of logotherapy and existential analysis. Love opens the paths to kindness, attention, valuing, respect, tolerance, and support as the heartbeat of meaningful relationships.

COURSE OVERVIEW
Module I
            Overview of the life of Viktor E. Frankl as he developed Logotherapy and Existential analysis to help others find meaning in their lives. Noticing significant relationships in his life.
Module II
            Overview of the notion of unconditional meaning in life. Observing the ways in which this concept shapes and brings hope in relationships.
Module III
            Overview of Will to Meaning as a source of motivation to reach beyond the self to find meaning. Exploring the implications of this concept for relationships in terms of attentiveness and value discernment.
Module IV
            Overview of the relevance of the Freedom of Will. Reflecting on the anthropological basis of logotherapy and the relevance of freedom of will in relationships.
Module V
            Overview of how the freedom of will is experienced in relation to the self, others, the world (nature) and the transcendent. Reflecting on the personal experience of freedom and responsibility, vulnerability, and intactness.
Module VI
Overview of the relational foundations of meaning-centered psychotherapy with the aim to alleviate suffering. Fostering meaning-centered relationships is at the core of meaning-centered interventions.

REQUIRED READINGS: WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS:
Weekly Papers: Each of the six Modules of this course requires a 500–1000-word reflection paper to the assigned readings and topics covered – ideally from a pastoral counseling perspective.
Final Paper for the course will consist of a compilation of the “edited” papers previously written for Modules I - VI. The final paper should be about 3000-words in length. It is evaluated by the faculty and the student receives a copy of the evaluation and a notice of completion of the course from the Office of the Registrar of the Graduate Theological Foundation.

THE PROCESS:
The student studies the assigned materials and e-mails a 500-1000-word response paper to the faculty member for each of the six Modules, one per week. As per prior agreement, the faculty person will either send reviews of each of the student’s reflection papers by e-mail or offer a telephone tutorial (1/2 hour for each Module) where the material covered can be discussed and pertinent questions entertained.  At the end of the six sessions, the student submits a final paper, consisting of the six combined 500-word papers, which the student has edited in light of the faculty person’s guidance during the course.
Course Outline:
Module I:
Reading Assignment: The Feeling of Meaninglessness: A Challenge to Psychotherapy and Philosophy (pages 8 to 39).
Anthropological Basis of Meaning Centered Psychotherapy. The Roots of Logophilospphy in the Life of Viktor E Frankl (pages 9 to 36).
Writing Assignment: The 500 to 1,000-word paper for Module I will reflect on the following questions: After reviewing Viktor E. Frankl’s life, how would you describe his relationships? What stands out to you with respect to his relationship to himself, others, the world and the transcendent?
MODULE II:
Reading Assignment: The Feeling of Meaninglessness: A Challenge to Psychotherapy and Philosophy. The feeling of meaninglessness: A Challenge to Psychotherapy (pages 41 to 48); Psychiatry and Man’s Quest for Meaning (pages 49 to 60).
Anthropological Basis of Meaning Centered Psychotherapy. The Unconditional Meaning in Life (pages 37 to 68).
Writing Assignment:   The 500 to 1,000-word paper for Module II will reflect on the following questions: What is Frankl’s concept of unconditional meaning in life and how does this notion shape one’s understanding of oneself in relationships?
Module III:
Reading Assignment: The Feeling of Meaninglessness: A Challenge to Psychotherapy and Philosophy. The Pluralism of Sciences and the Unity of Man (pages 137 to 155).
Anthropological Basis of Meaning Centered Psychotherapy. The Will to Meaning (pages 101 to 139).
Writing Assignment: The 500 to 1,000-word paper for Module III will reflect on the following questions: What does it imply that the will to meaning is oriented towards other than the self? What are the implications of the will to meaning for relationships?
Module IV:
Reading Assignment: The Feeling of Meaninglessness: A Challenge to Psychotherapy and Philosophy. The Concept of Man in Logotherapy (pages 71 to 105).
Anthropological basis of Meaning Centered Psychotherapy. Freedom of Will (pages 69 to 100).
Writing Assignment: The 500 to 1,000-word paper for Module IV will reflect on the following questions: What is the relevance of the freedom of will for meaningful relationships? What is the role of consent in meaningful relationships?
module V:
Reading Assignment: The Feeling of Meaninglessness: A Challenge to Psychotherapy and Philosophy. On the Shoulders of Giants (pages 203 to 207).
Anthropological Basis of Meaning Centered Psychotherapy. Validation of the Experience of Freedom of Will (pages 167 to 193).
Writing Assignment: The 500 to 1,000-word paper for Module V will reflect on the following questions: What is your experience of the freedom of will in your relationships to self, others, the world and the transcendent?
module VI:
Reading Assignment: The Feeling of Meaninglessness: A Challenge to Psychotherapy and Philosophy. From Lecture Hall to Auschwitz (pages 209 to 220).
Anthropological Basis of Meaning Centered Psychotherapy. Evidence-based Logotherapy (pages 141 to 165).
Writing Assignment: The 500 to 1,000-word paper for Module VI will reflect on the following questions: What is the importance of meaningful relationships in the alleviation of suffering? In what ways does meaning-centered psychotherapy alleviate suffering through relationships?
Final Paper: After you have reviewed the instructors’ comments and edited your six session papers, combine them into one 3000-word final paper and submit it for review. Failure to submit the final paper within 30 days of the 6th paper deadline will result in a permanent loss of course credit.
FACULTY:
Edward Marshall MD, PhD
Diplomate Clinician in Logotherapy
Viktor E. Frankl Professor in Psychotherapy and Spirituality
Graduate Theological Foundation
Email: edward.marshall.gtf@gmail.com
Cell: +1-613-979-9133

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Well-being through Meaning

Faculty: Edward Marshall, MD, PhD. (Profile)

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

With a focus on the phenomenological experience of the helping professional, this course offers an overview of the factors related to the experience of burnout and reviews relevant issues related to the prevalence, identification, and assessment of burnout. Factors related to fostering resilience and the prevention of burnout are discussed with special emphasis on the relevance of finding meaning to enhance coping and well-being. Practical meaning centered interventions are presented and discussed.

COURSE OVERVIEW

Module I
            Overview of the phenomenological experience and identification of burnout. Definition and causes of burnout in the workplace, specifically in the helping professions. The assessment of burnout. Burnout is a global concern, and an awareness of its prevalence helps to reduce the stigma attached to experiencing it.
Module II
            Overview of the concept of resilience and its phenomenological correlates. The assessment of resilience. Exploring the dialectic between resilience and burnout. A resilient individual can experience burnout. Resilience has been shown to promote personal growth.
Module III
            Overview of how to become aware of the early warning signs of burnout. The role of social support for increasing resilience. Physical, mental, and spiritual aspects of self-care.
Module IV
            Overview of the evidence and importance of religion, spirituality, and the search for meaning to face life challenges. Spiritual vitality helps to actualize values, increase purpose directed action and the actualization of meaningful goals.
Module V
            Overview of the relationship between body, mind, and spirit to improve well-being. A holistic view of the person. Findings from neuroscience that can help to prevent burnout and improve well-being. Existential dialectics and burnout prevention.
Module VI
            Overview of practical meaning centered interventions to improve well-being and life satisfaction. Acceptance, gratitude, discovering areas of freedom and responsibility, and the response-ability to burnout.

REQUIRED READINGS: WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS:

Weekly Papers: Each of the six Modules of this course requires a 500–1000-word reflection paper to the assigned readings and topics covered – ideally from a pastoral counseling perspective.
Final Paper for the course will consist of a compilation of the “edited” papers previously written for Modules I - VI. The final paper should be about 3000-words in length. It is evaluated by the faculty and the student receives a copy of the evaluation and a notice of completion of the course from the Office of the Registrar of the Graduate Theological Foundation.

THE PROCESS:

The student studies the assigned materials and e-mails a 500-1000-word response paper to the faculty member for each of the six Modules, one per week. As per prior agreement, the faculty person will either send reviews of each of the student’s reflection papers by e-mail, or offer a telephone tutorial (1/2 hour for each Module) where the material covered can be discussed and pertinent questions entertained.  At the end of the six sessions, the student submits a final paper, consisting of the six combined 500-word papers, which the student has edited in light of the faculty person’s guidance during the course.

Course Outline:

Module I:
Reading Assignment: Wellbeing through Meaning: Burnout Prevention for the Helping Professional. Chapters: Definition of Burnout (pages 9 to 12); Burnout in the Helping Professions (pages 13 to 22); Assessment of Burnout (pages 23 to 26).
Resilience: The Science of Mastering Life’s Greatest Challenges. Chapter: Role Models: Providing the Road Map (pages 158 to 174).
Writing Assignment: The 500 to 1,000-word paper for Module I will reflect on the following questions: What is your personal understanding of burnout? What do you think may predispose someone to burnout? What do think may be some preventive factors? Which could be factors related to burnout? How would burnout be manifested? How would burnout affect the person experiencing it? How would those around them be affected?

MODULE II:
Reading Assignment: Wellbeing through Meaning: Burnout Prevention for the Helping Professional. Chapters: Wellbeing and Resilience (pages 27 to 48); Assessment of Resilience (pages 49-56); Development and Resilience (pages 57 to 70).
Resilience: The Science of Mastering Life’s Greatest Challenges. Chapter: What is Resilience? (pages 1 to 34).
Writing Assignment:   The 500 to 1,000-word paper for Module II will reflect on the following questions: Who would be a resilient person in your opinion? What characteristics would describe a resilient person? Why is resilience relevant for the helping professional? How could a person develop, or increase their resilience? How would you talk to others about the nature and purpose of resilience?

Module III:
Reading Assignment: Wellbeing through Meaning: Burnout Prevention for the Helping Professional. Chapter: Self-Awareness and Self-Care (pages 71 to 74).
Resilience: The Science of Mastering Life’s Greatest Challenges. Chapters: Social Support: Learning the Tap Code (pages 136 to 157); Training: Physical fitness and Strengthening (pages 175 to 198); Brain fitness: Challenge your Mind and Heart (pages 199 to 225).
Writing Assignment: The 500 to 1,000-word paper for Module III will reflect on the following questions: What is self-care? What is the role of self-care in the everyday practice of the helping professional? What may be some obstacles to practicing physical and mental fitness? How to motivate individuals to be physically and mentally active? What is the role of the human spirit in weathering adversity?

Module IV:
Reading Assignment: Wellbeing through Meaning: Burnout Prevention for the Helping Professional. Chapters: Self-transcendence and Meaning in Life (pages 75 to 84); Search for Meaning (pages 85 to 94).
Resilience. The Science of Mastering Life’s Greatest Challenges: Religion and Spirituality: Drawing on Faith (pages 110 to 135); Meaning, Purpose and Growth (pages 251 to 267).
Writing Assignment: The 500 to 1,000-word paper for Module IV will reflect on the following questions: How would you explain the relevance of religion, spirituality, and the search for meaning in facing life’s challenges? What are the reasons why these practices may be important for optimal human functioning? What are some examples of personal growth?

Module V:
Reading Assignment: Wellbeing through Meaning: Burnout Prevention for the Helping Professional. Chapters: Neuroscience and Meaning (pages 111 to 120); Dialectics of a Life Worth Living (pages 121 to 138).
Resilience. The Science of Mastering Life’s Greatest Challenges: Optimism: Belief in a Brighter Future (pages 35 to 62); Facing Fear: An Adaptive Response (pages 63 to 84).
Writing Assignment: The 500 to 1,000-word paper for Module V will reflect on the following questions: How do you think body, mind, and spirit work together? What is the relevance of considering these three human dimensions for well-being? What resources are available in the dimension of spirit? How do these resources help to choose one’s response to adversity? How do these resources help to choose one’s response to events beyond one’s control? 

Module VI:
Reading Assignment: Wellbeing through Meaning: Burnout Prevention for the Helping Professional. Chapters: Meaning and Burnout Prevention (pages139 to 152); Meaning Centered Interventions (pages 153 to 168).
Resilience: The Science of Mastering Life’s Greatest Challenges. Chapters: Moral Compass, Ethics, and Altruism: Doing what is Right (pages 85 to 109); The Practice of Resilience (pages 268 to 294).
Writing Assignment: The 500 to 1,000-word paper for Module VI will reflect on the following questions: How would you apply meaning-centered interventions in your own life? How would you integrate these interventions into your work with others?

Final Paper: After you have reviewed the instructors’ comments and edited your six session papers, combine them into one 3000-word final paper and submit it for review. Failure to submit the final paper within 30 days of the 6th paper deadline will result in a permanent loss of course credit.

FACULTY:
Edward Marshall MD, PhD
The Viktor Frankl Professor of Logotherapy and Spirituality
Diplomate Clinician in Logotherapy
Graduate Theological Foundation
Email: edward.marshall.gtf@gmail.com
Cell: +1-613-979-9133

Online Registration Form

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